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Winding Oak's Bookology Magazine

From Gridlock to Road Trip

gridlock

If you were stuck in bumper to bumper gridlock, heading south on Hwy 100 last week, you may have noticed a woman laughing all alone in her car as she waited patiently (with eyes on the road) for things to start moving again. The very next day you might have caught a glimpse of that same lady wiping a tear or two from her cheek, again, staying attentive to the traffic. This emotional driver wasn’t reacting to the road congestion or the fact that her time behind the windshield was double what it should be. The source of her amusement and sadness was coming from her car radio speakers, more specifically, the audiobook Gone Crazy in Alabama, written by Rita Williams-Garcia, narrated by Sisi A. Johnson. That captivated listener/careful motorist was me, making the most of rush hour by savoring a story that begs to be heard in audio format.

Gone Crazy in AlabamaThe Gaither sisters, Delphine, Vonetta and Fern, along with Big Ma, their grandmother, and Ma Charles, their great grandmother, joined me for the commute down Hwy 100 for about a week. The combination of exquisite writing by Ms. Williams and enthralling narration by Ms. Johnson transformed several days of difficult maneuvering on the interstate to an extended road trip with some of my very best friends. There was even one morning when I finally arrived at the school parking lot only to have to pull myself away from my vehicle, after telling myself “Just five more minutes to finish this chapter!”

In addition to Gone Crazy in Alabama, I have enjoyed nearly three dozen other audio titles in the past year. My top recommendations stand out for their memorable and engaging narrations. Other than The Hate U Give (most appropriate for age 12+), these audiobooks would be great additions to middle grade (4th-6th) classrooms.

All American Boys by Brenden Kiely and Jason Reynolds

Crossover by Kwame Alexander

Echo by Pam Muñoz Ryan

Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan

The Hate U Give by Angela Thomas

Listen, SlowlyListen Slowly by Thanhha Lai

One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia

P.S. Be Eleven by Rita Williams-Garcia

Refugee by Alan Katz

Reign Rain by Ann M. Martin

Stella by Starlight by Sharon Draper

The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

My all-time favorite audiobook adventure was Echo, by Pam Munoz Ryan. With a running time of ten and a half hours, this masterpiece is well worth every minute spent taking in the captivating tale of magic, mystery and harmonica music. The fate of three children is interwoven from Germany to the United States, from the Rise of Hitler to post-Pearl Harbor as the harmonica plays an integral role in the characters’ connections and the book’s conclusion. I am convinced that the audio production of Echo offers a unique and memorable experience that is beyond comparison to either the read aloud or independent reading option. Whether Echo becomes your first audiobook or lands at the top of your existing “to be listened to” list, you will not be disappointed (well, perhaps you will be, but only because it has to come to an end).

If you are looking for other great audio picks, consider the award winners chosen by YALSA and ALSC.

The Odyssey Award sponsored by YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) recognizes the best audiobook produced each year for children and/or young adults. In 2016, the Honor Recording was Echo.

In addition to the Odyssey Award winners, a longer list of exemplary audio recordings are offered annually on the Notable Children’s Recordings list, selected by the ALSC (Association for Library Service to Children). In 2011, One Crazy Summer was recognized.

Lately, I’ve been reflecting on a powerful quote from Kylene Beers from Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading; “Nonfiction lets us learn more; fiction lets us be more.” This is what I want most for young readers and I bet you do as well.  Yet, like me, you might wonder just how many of our kids have ever experienced this powerful aspect of fiction? I believe that for some, if not many, exceptional audiobooks may be the ticket to helping kids be more through the books they experience. There was a time in my teaching career when I didn’t give audiobooks and their listeners the credit they deserve. I have come to appreciate the aural reading experience both personally and professionally. I hope you feel the same.

Resources that promote access to audiobooks:

Epic!

Epic! is the leading digital library for kids, with unlimited access to an incredible selection of 25,000 high-quality books, learning videos, quizzes and more. You can access Epic! on any device, including your smartphone, iPad or computer—FREE for educators!

Overdrive

Borrow eBooks, audiobooks, and more from your local public library—anywhere, anytime. All you need is a library card.

Scribd

Scribd is a reading subscription that is available anytime and on any device. Enjoy access to 3 books and 1 audiobook each month—plus unlimited access to magazines and documents—for $8.99/month.

Skybrary

Skybrary is a carefully curated, ever expanding interactive library of digital books and video explorations designed to engage young readers and foster a love of learning.

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