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Winding Oak's Bookology Magazine

Tag Archives | cooking

Apples, Well-Being, and Family

Bring Me Some Apples and I'll Make You a PieBring Me Some Apples and I’ll Make You a Pie: A Story about Edna Lewis is a memorable book about growing food throughout the seasons and living off the land in Virginia. Wild strawberry, purslane, dandelions, sassafras, honey. As spring rides the breeze into summer, this extended family tends to their larder, taking full advantage of the fruits, nuts, and vegetables growing around them. Summer subdues itself into fall. Time to bring in the corn and beans, take a last harvest of pecans before winter sets in.

This way of life may be unfamiliar to a large percentage of children, but even though the book is set in the 1920s, everything about the story feels contemporary. Perhaps it is a way of life that withstands time.

Food is the focus because this is a glimpse of the early life of Edna Lewis, renowned chef and Southern cookbook author. As the author and watercolor illustrator Robbin Gourley writes, “But her most significant contribution was to make people aware of the importance of preserving traditional methods of growing and preparing food and of bringing ingredients directly from the field to the table.” With our current resurgence of interest in a farm-to-table lifestyle, this book is a good way to talk about food and nutrition with your children.

Bring Me Some Apples and I'll Bake You a Pie

Quite a few traditional sayings are included in the book:

“Raccoon up the pecan tree.
Possum on the ground.
Raccoon shake the pecans down.
Possum pass ‘em round.”

Your mouth will water so much while you’re reading this book that you’ll be glad there are five recipes in the back of the book, from Strawberry Shortcake to Pecan Drops.

The watercolor illustrations throughout are charming and informative, warm and loving. The color palette of clear, bright tones adds to the feeling of health and well-being.

It’s a worthwhile addition to your home, school, or public library.

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Orange Omelet

Chasing Freedom takes place in the late 1800s—this recipe is one that might have been served at a luncheon.

Orange Omelet
Serves 2
A forgotten recipe from the 1890s, more of a dessert omelet, resembling a sweet crepe
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Ingredients
  1. 4 eggs
  2. 5 Tbsp sugar
  3. Pinch of salt
  4. 2 organic oranges
  5. 2 T butter
Instructions
  1. Grate the rind of one orange on one tablespoonful of sugar. Pare and cut the orange in thin slices and sprinkle with two tablespoonfuls of sugar.
  2. Beat the whites of the eggs stiff, add the sugar and orange rind, salt, beaten yolks, and two tablespoonfuls of orange juice.
  3. Put butter in a hot omelet pan and pour in the mixture. When it begins to thicken well, spread over the sliced oranges (no juice).
  4. Fold omelet from the side of the pan over the sliced oranges, turn out on a hot dish.
  5. Put in the oven for two minutes. Serve immediately.
Notes
  1. At one time, cookbooks were infamous for not telling the cook how long or how hot or how to particularly cook the dish. If you've cooked an omelet before, this should feel familiar.
Adapted from Resurrected Recipes
Bookology Magazine http://www.bookologymagazine.com/
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Dinosaur Eggs

 

Dinosaur Eggs
Serves 6
When you're done with a day of tromping through the primordial savannah, on the lookout for dinosaurs, have some of these on hand for your avid dinosaur fans.
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Prep Time
35 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
1 hr
Prep Time
35 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
1 hr
Ingredients
  1. 6 medium hard-boiled eggs
  2. 1.5 lbs ground spicy sausage
  3. 1/2 cup bread crumbs
  4. 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  5. 1/4 tsp pepper
  6. 2 Tbsp canola oil
  7. Hot sauce (optional)
  8. Brown mustard (optional)
Instructions
  1. Peel boiled eggs. Mix seasonings and bread crumbs together.
  2. Divide sausage into six equal amounts.
  3. Flatten sausage into thin patties and wrap around eggs.
  4. Roll each egg in bread crumbs.
  5. Heat oil in skillet.
  6. Fry eggs in hot oil until well browned, turning frequently.
  7. May also be baked in oven at 325 deg F for 25 minutes or until browned
  8. Serve with hot sauce or mustard if desired.
Adapted from allthecooks.com
Adapted from allthecooks.com
Bookology Magazine http://www.bookologymagazine.com/
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Skinny Dip with Kate DiCamillo

Kate DiCamilloDo you remember any book reports you wrote or gave while in elementary school?

No one has ever asked me this question before! Here is the truth: I don’t remember doing one, single book report. Have I blocked the memories out? Or did I really not do any? I’m thinking it’s the latter. Truly.

Describe your all-time favorite pair of pajamas.

Red flannel. Decorated with dogs. And Milk bones. Divine.

What was the best Halloween costume you’ve ever worn or seen?

I love the Bugs Bunny mask I wore when I was three. I can still smell the interior of that mask. I can still feel the power of *hiding* behind that mask.

Are you good at wrapping presents?

Ha ha ha. I am laughing. And I can hear my mother laughing from the great beyond. I inherited my inability to wrap presents from her. Present-wrapping always ends up with me in the middle of a great big snarl of wrapping paper and scotch tape. Imagine Bink wrapping a present and you get the right visual.

Do you like to cook for friends or meet them at a restaurant?

Still laughing. Cook for friends? Me? I like to go to *their* houses and eat *their* food. But I do take them out to restaurants to return the favor.

Which outdoor activity are you most likely to participate in: running; fishing; leaf raking; parade watching?

Parade watching. I love a parade. And it’s all a parade.

When did you get your first library card, and from what library?

*Swoon* I got my first library card when was I seven. I got it from the Cooper Memorial Public Library.

Favorite bird?

Crow.

 Which children’s book do you wish you’d read as a child?

Matilda. It wasn’t in our school library or the public library. Strange, huh?

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Gifted: So, You Want to Be a Chef?

So, You Want to Be a Chef? How to Get Started in the World of Culinary Arts Be What You Want series J.M. Bedell Beyond Words/Aladdin, October 2013 Introduction If your child or teen is often caught watching cooking shows, they’re not alone. In 2010, Melissa Kossler Dutton on ParentDish.com wrote, “Every month, 12 million […]

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Cooking up a bookstorm

One of my favorite genres of reading is cookbooks. It all began when I was ten, the Christmas of 1963. My mother gave me Betty Crocker’s Cook Book for Boys and Girls, originally published in 1957 by Golden Books, illustrated by Gloria Kamen, and written by, well, Betty Crocker, of course! A lot of cooking […]

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