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Winding Oak's Bookology Magazine

Tag Archives | magic

One Day at the Farmers Market

Farmers MarketSaturday was gorgeous, and (Oh joy! Oh rapture!) the opening day of the Mill City Farmers Market, one of my favorite markets here in the Twin Cities. I got up and out the door in such a hurry I forgot my market basket, but no matter—there were just the earliest of crops available: asparagus, spinach, rhubarb…. I could carry the few things I needed—and truth be told, I was really after the experience more than the food. The chilly air coming off the Mississippi, the violin player on the corner, the chatter of vendors and customers, small kiddos looking for future crops like berries and corn-on-the-cob and apples…this is the kind of thing that will clear the rest of winter from the recesses of your soul! I got my coffee and blissfully wandered the stalls. If I were to design the perfect morning, this really is it.

And then—an unexpected gift!

Just as I was leaving for the busy Saturday ahead of me, I heard a rich baritone sing out. “STO-ries! STO-ries! It’s storytime! STORYtime!” The hair on he back of my neck stood up (in a good way). STORYTIME! Well, I wasn’t going to leave without stories!

I moseyed back over to the stone steps of the Guthrie Theater, the usual spot for programming during the farmers market. And sure enough, a company actor was there with a stack of kid books. Parents were getting their sticky-farmers-market- smudged-up kids settled at the man’s feet, moving to sit up a step or two and enjoy their coffee in peace. I fit right in, I told myself, even without any kids with me. I just sat down with the parents and smiled down benevolently on the squirmy mosh-pit of would-be story listeners, as if one of them was mine.

Reading at the Mill City Farmers Market

Reading and Storytelling at the Mill City Farmers Market

No sooner had the reader begun than all wiggles stopped. The first book: One Day In The Eucalyptus, Eucalyptus Tree by Daniel Bernstrom, illustrated by Brendan Wenzel. I couldn’t believe my luck! Bernstrom and I had gone to grad school together—and the book was but days old! I hadn’t even made it to the bookstore to get my copy yet!

One Day in the Eucalyptus, Eucalyptus TreeWell, it’s a hoot of a book—as I knew it would be—and what I witnessed on the steps to the Guthrie was none other than Storytime MAGIC. A marvelous story, terrific illustrations, and a fantastic reader! (I mean, the guy is a professional!) The kids were rapt as this man belted out the lines of the little boy who outsmarts the yellow snake who swallowed him up.

It’s a story with some similarities to I Know An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly and also to Brer Rabbit. The boy in this story is the Smart One, a more positive moniker, I think, than “Trickster,” as Brer Rabbit is often called. The yellow snake is taken by this smart boy. Everytime he swallows someone or something up, the boy talks about how much more room there is inside…and so the snake takes another victim. And then another. And another. It’s the very smallest thing that proves too much, of course, and the gross results were most pleasing to the young audience. One little girl clapped hard as the snake “expectorated” everyone and everything in his stomach.

Oh the kids loved it! The swingy rhymes, the fun word-rhythms—their little bodies swayed in time. The suspense! The fun! Their faith in the boy! Their joy as the snake’s belly grew larger and larger. “Look at that belly!” our storyteller exclaimed every other page turn.

It all worked to make me quite teary behind my sunglasses as I sat there among the young families. I was so happy for Daniel, so grateful this wonderful actor lent his voice and storytelling to the morning, so glad to have heard my classmate’s story before I read it. He has a wonderful gift with words and fun and rhythm and rhyme.

In my estimation, it was quite the perfect morning. Perhaps the only thing that could’ve made it better was having a little sticky person of my own on my lap to hear the story with me. But alas, those days are pretty well gone for me. (Sometimes I’m still able to borrow.) So it’s just the pure joy of being read to now, which, as it turns out, I’ve not outgrown. Don’t plan to either.

Thanks Daniel, thanks Mr. Wenzel—your book is terrific. Thank you Mill City Farmers Market and Guthrie Theater. Thank you to the wonderful storytime reader whose name I did not catch—your sung “STO-ries!” made my day. You were wonderful! The whole thing was wonderful.

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That Lovely Ornament, the Moon

by Jacqueline Briggs Martin and Phyllis Root

Jackie: We’ve passed the Solstice but we still have more night than day. We can watch the moon with our breakfast and with our dinner. We thought we’d celebrate this season of the moon by sharing some stories featuring that lovely ornament.

Phyllis: And Christmas Eve we saw an almost full moon casting shadows on the snow before the clouds blew in. Moonlight really is magical.

Papa Please Get the Moon For MeJackie: There’s lovely magic in Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me by Eric Carle. This book has been a favorite of mine since my days as a preschool teacher. It never fails to please the sit-on-the-rug crowd. What’s not to love? There’s Eric Carle’s wonderful moon, and a father so dedicated that he finds a “very long ladder” and takes it to “a very high mountain.” Then he climbs to the moon and waits until it’s just the right size. He brings it back and gives it to his daughter. She hugs it, jumps and dances with it—until it disappears.

The combination of fantasy and real-moon, family affection and joy is just timeless. This thirty year old story could have been written yesterday.

Kitten's First Full MoonPhyllis: In Kitten’s First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes, Kitten, too, yearns for the moon, mistaking it for a bowl of milk. “And she wanted it.” Closing her eyes and licking toward the moon only gives her a bug on her tongue, jumping at the moon ends in a tumble, and chasing the moon ends with Kitten up a tree and the moon no closer. After each attempt, the text reminds us of Kitten’s yearning: “Still, there was the little bowl of milk, just waiting.” When Kitten sees the moon’s reflection in the pond and leaps for it, she ends up tired, sad, and wet. Poor kitten! She returns home… to find a big bowl of milk on the porch, just waiting for her to lap it up.

Thirteen Moons on Turtle's BackJackie: Kittens and children and all of us are fascinated by the moon. Thirteen Moons on Turtle’s Back: a Native American Year of Moons (Penguin, 1992) by Joseph Bruchac and Jonathan London is a collection of thirteen poems about the seasons of the moon from “each of the thirteen Native American tribal nations in different regions of the continent [chosen] to give a wider sense of the many things Native American people have been taught to notice in this beautiful world around us.” The noticing is one thing I love about this book. Reading these poems makes me want to walk in the woods and see something in a new way.

Moon of Popping TreesIt feels as if we are in the season of the “Moon of Popping Trees.”

Outside the lodge
the night air is bitter cold.
Now the Frost giant walks
with his club in his hand.
When he strikes the trunks
of the cottonwood trees
we hear them crack
beneath the blow.
The people hide inside
when they hear that sound….

And that is much better than saying, “it’s cold.”

Phyllis: In “Baby Bear Moon” we learn how a small child lost in the snow was saved by sleeping all through the winter with a mother bear and her cubs. The poem concludes:

“when we walk by on our snowshoes
we will not bother a bear
or her babies. Instead
we think how those small bears
are like our children.
We let them dream together.”

Who wouldn’t want to sleep the winter away sharing dreams with bears?

Jackie: I love the poetry of this book—

“…Earth Elder
made the first tree,
a great oak with twelve branches
arching over the land.
Then, sitting down beneath it,
the sun shining bright,
Earth Elder thought
of food for the people,
and acorns began to form.”

Perhaps the best is that Bruchac and London encourage us to see more than trees and grass, to imagine a landscape, a thrumming with history, community, and the spirits of sharing.

MoonlightJackie: Moonlight by Helen V. Griffith (Greenwillow, 2012) is also a poetic text—and spare:

Rabbit hides in shadow
under cloudy skies
waiting for the moonlight
blinking sleepy eyes.

But he goes into his burrow and doesn’t see “Moonlight slides like butter/skims through outer space/skids past stars and comets/leaves a butter trace.”

What a wonderful image! “Moonlight slides like butter.” Who can look at moonlight the same again?

Phyllis: I love the spare language of this book, and I love Laura Dronzek’s luminous art as well, where moonlight really does butter every tree and slips into Rabbit’s dreams, awaking him to dance in the moonlight. So few words, but so well chosen—verbs such as skims and skids and skips and skitters. A wonderful pairing of words and art that makes me want to dance in the moonlight, too.

Owl MoonJane Yolen’s Owl Moon, which won a Caldecott for its evocative wintry art, is a story of an owl, patience, hope, and love. On a snowy night the narrator sets out to go on a long-awaited outing owling with Pa. She knows, because Pa says, that when you go owling you have to be quiet, you have to make your own heat, and you have to have hope. Their hope is finally rewarded when they spot an owl and stare into the owl’s eyes as it stare back before it flies away. The last image shows the small narrator being carried toward the lights of home by her pa. The book concludes:

When you go owling
you don’t need words
or warm
or anything but hope.
That’s what Pa says.
The kind of hope
that flies
on silent wings
under a shining
Owl Moon.

Jackie: “When you go owling/you don’t need words/or warm/ or anything but hope.” The shining moon, a light in the night, a lamp of hope that we turn into a friend in the sky. These books make me grateful for long nights.

Phyllis: And for moonlight and dreams and dancing.

 

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Reading Ahead: Levitate Your Brother!

Big Magic for Little Hands

by Vicki Palmquist

We recently hosted a Harry Potter party for adults for which everyone was asked to perform a magic trick. Some people fiercely addressed the challenge. Some people panicked. Some people bought a trick off the internet. I turned to Joshua Jay’s Big Magic for Little Hands (Workman Publishing Co).

Citing all the benefits of learning to perform magic, the author reveals that he wasn’t a reader until he needed to know about magic. Learning magic tricks and performing them gives a child confidence and helps with public speaking skills. “Others have integrated magic into their jobs, using effects to break the ice or complete a sale or relax a jury.”

There are diagrams and terminology and suggested stage setups. There are helpful hints (overcoming stage fright). There are lists of materials needed for each feat of prestidigitation.

With compelling black, white, and red illustrations, the diagrams are easy to follow, convincing even the most skeptical that they could make these tricks work.

The writing is not just step-by-step instructional–Jay writes with humor and an appreciation of what’s practical.

The materials are items you probably have on hand in your household. When one list includes a top hat, Jay writes “A top hat works great, but you could also decorate an empty tissue box and use that, or use your dad’s cowboy hat. (Note: This only works if your dad is a cowboy.)”

Perhaps most of all, I enjoyed the real-life stories of magic such as “Houdini’s Great Plane Escape.” When Houdini was filming the movie The Grim Game, a stunt required climbing by rope from one plane to the other. During the stunt, the two planes collided and crashed to the ground. What happened? Well, that would be telling. According to Jay, a good magician never shares a secret or tells how it is done. Big Magic for Little Hands will tell you but I won’t.

Highly recommended for kids aged 8 and older (and the adults in their lives who will be just as fascinated). It’s a large format book with a big heart and plenty of fascination between its covers. A great gift. A good, readable, and hours-of-fun addition to your library.

 

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Anatomy of a Series: Topps League Books

We’re in post-season, when a lot of fans start to look wild-eyed, wondering how they’ll hang on for three months until spring training starts in February. Here in Minnesota, it’s tough for sandlot baseball or Little League games to be played in the snow with an icy baseline. Young fans can keep up the momentum […]

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