Winding Oak's Bookology Magazine

Archive | Cookology

Fried Rice and Ohana

Imag­ine a clus­ter of smil­ing keikis, (kids), sit­ting around a cal­abash filled with mouth-water­ing Hawaii local-style fried rice. Shar­ing deli­cious food from a cal­abash serv­ing bowl is a Hawaii tra­di­tion. As it does every­where around the world, not just in Hawaii, eat­ing meals togeth­er cre­ates com­mon bonds for every­one, chil­dren and adults alike, solid­i­fy­ing the feel­ing of ohana, or fam­i­ly. Talk­ing sto­ry, enjoy­ing laugh­ter, weav­ing togeth­er remem­brances of times gone by — and build­ing mem­o­ries for the future — are all a part of shar­ing a cal­abash meal. It is the very warp and woof of island life, prompt­ing the use of the endear­ing term, “cal­abash cousin.”

Dur­ing the many years our fam­i­ly lived in Hawaii, and on our annu­al return vis­its, we always look for­ward to shar­ing a par­tic­u­lar­ly local dish with our friends and fam­i­ly, Local-Style Da Kine Fried Rice. I’d like you to share this meal with your ohana and those you care about….and it makes great left­overs — and freezes well! Did I men­tion it is gluten-free?

fried riceLocal-Style Da Kine Fried Rice

  1. Cook a pot (in a rice cook­er if you have one)— about three reg­u­lar mea­sur­ing cups — of short grain rice (not long grain!) and let it cool overnight or longer in a zip-lock in the fridge. The next day, take the rice out of the fridge, open up the zip-lock, and let the rice come to room tem­per­a­ture before start­ing, unless you want rice pop­ping all over your cook­top because of the mois­ture!
  1. In a sauté pan, put about 2 – 3 table­spoons EACH of sesame oil and cook­ing oil. Heat.
  1. Beat five eggs briefly with a fork and 1 tea­spoon salt and pour into the oil. Cook as if you were mak­ing scram­bled eggs. 
  1. When cooked, remove eggs from pan with slot­ted spoon and put in a bowl. Keep the oil in the pan.
  1. Cut up five pieces of bacon in 12″ pieces. Put in sauté pan and fry till crisp. Remove to same bowl as eggs.
  1. Put ricein­to sauté pan and fry for about ten min­utes, turn­ing every now and then, scrap­ing bot­tom of pan. 
  1. Put bacon and eggs back into pan and add about 14 c. or more chopped green onion. Stir well.
  1. Sim­mer, stir­ring every fif­teen min­utes or so, scrap­ing up brown bits from bot­tom of pan, for about 45 min­utes. Adding shoyu (soy sauce) is very option­al depend­ing on per­son­al pref­er­ence.
  1. Grab your ohana—and your chop­sticks!

[Soren­son-Mar­go-Bio]

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Cardamom Scones

I adore books that have food details. I like to know what the char­ac­ters are eat­ing. Even bet­ter, I like to know what they’re cook­ing and bak­ing. And if there’s a food or feast that plays a promi­nent role in the plot, I’m hooked.

Turns out, these are the sorts of books I enjoy writ­ing, as well. My nov­el, Giant Pump­kin Suite, has a grand­moth­er who is quite ded­i­cat­ed to the culi­nary arts. And my pic­ture book, Around the Table that Grandad Built, is entire­ly about food and gath­er­ing peo­ple to eat.

cardamomThe nov­el I’m cur­rent­ly work­ing on fea­tures a par­tic­u­lar spice: car­damom. Full dis­clo­sure: I love car­damom. Some­times when I just need a lift, I put some car­damom pods in my mor­tar and pes­tle and grind them up for fun — the smell alone can change the course of a day! If I could, I’d plant it in my gar­den.

Car­damom is a peren­ni­al in the gin­ger fam­i­ly. It grows wild in India and Sri Lan­ka, and is cul­ti­vat­ed in oth­er con­sis­tent­ly warm coun­tries like Guatemala and Tan­za­nia, two of the lead­ing pro­duc­ers of the spice here in the twen­ty-first cen­tu­ry. It would not sur­vive in my Min­neso­ta gar­den, alas.

But car­damom is a com­mon ingre­di­ent in Scan­di­na­vian bak­ing, chai tea, Soma­li tea, and East Indi­an cur­ries, all of which are favorite foods of mine, and all of which are read­i­ly avail­able in Min­neso­ta, so I man­age to indulge reg­u­lar­ly. Car­damom can be found in many cul­tures, actu­al­ly — Chi­nese med­i­cine, Ethiopi­an and Eritre­an cuisines, and the foods, teas and cof­fees of most Arab coun­tries, just to name a few. Such an inter­est­ing spice — at home in so many foods!

Car­damom is in the work­ing title of my nov­el and is fea­tured in all kinds of food and drink over the course of the book’s plot. I’ve been doing some cook­ing and bak­ing exper­i­men­ta­tion along side the writ­ing, which my fam­i­ly appre­ci­ates.

We love scones at our house and I’ve tried a num­ber of recipes, bor­row­ing cer­tain parts from each to make my own recipe. This is the one we’ve land­ed on at our house — so easy and smells heav­en­ly.

Cardamom Scones

SCONES

2 cups of unbleached all-pur­pose flour
½ cup of whole wheat flour
½ cup packed light brown sug­ar
1 ½ tea­spoon bak­ing pow­der
½ tea­spoon bak­ing soda
½ tea­spoon of fresh­ly ground car­damom (It’s tempt­ing to put in more — don’t! Car­damom is best sub­tly applied! And if you can’t find it to grind your­self, just buy it ground — fresh as you can find it.)
Pinch of cin­na­mon (option­al)
½ cup but­ter
1 Table­spoon of vanil­la extract (vanil­la paste is even bet­ter!)
Just a swal­low over ¾ cup of cold but­ter­milk

Pre­heat the oven to 400 degrees. Bake on the mid­dle rack posi­tion. Use parch­ment paper for ease of clean-up and even­ly browned scone bot­toms.

  1. In a food proces­sor, com­bine the dry ingre­di­ents and pulse to com­bine. Cut the but­ter into table­spoon sized por­tions and add to the dry ingre­di­ents. Pulse until there are pea sized crumbs. Work quick­ly! It’s like pie crust — you don’t want the but­ter to get warm. (And yes, you could do this by hand, just like you do with pie crust, but I like the ease and uni­form results of the food proces­sor.)
  2. Whisk togeth­er the but­ter­milk and vanil­la. Add these liq­uids to the but­tery dry ingre­di­ents and mix just until the dough comes togeth­er — do not over mix!
  3. Turn the dough out onto a floured sur­face and knead just enough to get the dry pieces incor­po­rat­ed — do this quick­ly as you don’t want the but­ter to warm. Flat­ten into a 7−8” round and cut into pie shaped wedges. Place the result­ing tri­an­gu­lar scones on the bak­ing sheet, leav­ing plen­ty of room around each. (They won’t expand much, but they need to brown even­ly and so don’t like to be crowd­ed.)
  4. Bake 15 – 20 min­utes until gold­en brown. While they cool a bit, make your­self some Soma­li Tea, or Chai Tea to go with your scones — your house will smell heav­en­ly!

You can find won­der­ful tea recipes replete with his­toric and cul­tur­al detail here:

Soma­li shaah

Masala chai

These scones will warm up nice­ly in the oven or toast­er oven the next day. If you have left­overs…

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For the Love of Pickles

Know some pick­le crazy kids? I do! A favorite birth­day din­ner that my grand­kids request is Pick­le Pas­ta (recipe below) — not the cold pas­ta sal­ad vari­ety, mind you, but warm but­tery noo­dles dot­ted with briny pick­les. My daugh­ter cre­at­ed this sim­ple but oh-so-sat­is­fy­ing dish dur­ing her col­lege days when the cup­boards were some­times near­ly bare.

Sarah's Pickle Pasta

I guar­an­tee you will have eaters who pick the pick­les out to savor sep­a­rate­ly; and eaters who will pre­fer bites of pas­ta with their pick­les — either way it’s the per­fect oppor­tu­ni­ty to chant: “Peter Piper picked a plate of pick­led pas­ta.” Then it’s time for a pick­le sto­ry or two.

Two favorites are Lau­ren McGill’s Pick­le Muse­um (Har­court 2003) by Jer­dine Nolen and the ever­green Pick­le Things (Parent’s Mag­a­zine Press, 1980) by Marc Brown.

Lauren McGill's Pickle MuseumKids will enjoy Jer­dine Nolen’s unique tall-tale voice and super descrip­tive lan­guage in Lau­ren McGill’s Pick­le Muse­um. Lau­ren McGill is obsessed with pick­les until the day she vis­its a pick­le fac­to­ry and her class­mates go crazy for pick­les, too.

Sud­den­ly, Lauren’s spe­cial thing doesn’t seem very spe­cial. After adjust­ing her out­look, Lau­ren dis­cov­ers a way to share her love of pick­les that brings hap­pi­ness to oth­ers and her­self.

Look for this book with its cheery and charm­ing illus­tra­tions (don’t miss the pick­le quilt) by Deb­bie Tilley at the library or used book store.

Pickle ThingsPick­le Things will get every­one gig­gling. Marc Brown’s clas­sic rhyming book is great for new read­ers, while adults find the sil­ly pick­le inter­ac­tions fun­ny, too. The illus­tra­tion of a pick­le leav­ing a ring in the bath tub is my favorite. And don’t laugh too hard at the notion of pick­le pies and pick­le cakes. Check the inter­net for trendy pick­le cup­cake recipes. Hmm…The per­fect dessert for pick­le pas­ta night?

The old­er edi­tion of Pick­le Things is avail­able at libraries, while a new­er reprint (Marc Brown Stu­dios, 2016) can be found at stores or online.

Sarah’s Pick­le Pas­ta
Serves 6 – 8

1 16 ounce box elbow mac­a­roni*
6 Tbsp. but­ter
2 cups (or more) chopped dill pick­les
Splash of pick­le juice (option­al)
Sea­soned salt
Fresh grat­ed parme­san cheese

Boil the pas­ta accord­ing to box instruc­tions and drain.

Sautée the pick­les in melt­ed but­ter until heat­ed through.

Add but­ter to drained pas­ta and sprin­kle with plen­ty of sea­soned salt.

Mix in a splash of pick­le juice and top with fresh­ly grat­ed parme­san cheese.

*Veg­etable pas­ta can be used to improve the health­i­ness of this dish  

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Carrot Soup

Carrot SoupCar­rots are most often served raw in our home due to our sons’ pref­er­ences. But five years ago at the library we found the book Car­rot Soup by John Segal. Of the dozen or so books we checked out that week, my preschool­er asked for this one to be reread the most.  

On the last page, there’s a recipe for rab­bit’s favorite car­rot soup. We made a half a batch. Both boys ate a small serv­ing of the soup, and my old­er son even asked for sec­onds. He sug­gest­ed I write the recipe down before we return the book. I did, and I’ve made the soup a num­ber of times since. This fall, it proved to be a good way to use up car­rots grown in our gar­den.

Sopa de ZanahoriaI’ve tried oth­er car­rot soup recipes, but this is the one I keep com­ing back to, for its sim­plic­i­ty and its but­tered-car­rot fla­vor. Some fam­i­ly mem­bers are not into dill or pars­ley, so I usu­al­ly leave that out. Gar­nish­es, on the oth­er hand, are often a win with kids. Try sprin­kling a few crou­tons or roast­ed chick­peas on top. Or even pop­corn. Bet­ter yet, let them choose if they want to add the crunchy top­pings to their soup or just eat them on the side.  

I checked Car­rot Soup out again last week, to revis­it it for old time’s sake. My kids remem­bered it — and were more or less will­ing to hear the sto­ry one more time. I smiled at how one seem­ing­ly ran­dom book selec­tion has left us with a mem­o­ry of a shared sto­ry and a recipe we keep in our fall rota­tion.

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Cozy Reading Chili

We’ve been out­side enjoy­ing the sum­mer and fall weath­er, but now it’s time to set­tle in for a win­ter’s worth of read­ing. Enjoy this yum­my chili while you read.

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Chocolate Croissant Bread Pudding

Chocolate Croissant Bread Pudding

Eat dessert first! Inspired by Rube Gold­berg’s love of Cool Whip (and Sarah’s love of writ­ing what makes her hap­py!)
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time1 hr 5 mins
Author: Sarah Aron­son

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs plus 4 egg yolks
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 12 cup unsweet­ened cocoa pow­der
  • 1−1÷2 cups heavy cream
  • 1−1÷2 tsp cin­na­mon
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 8 oz bit­ter­sweet choco­late
  • 1−1÷2 cup sug­ar
  • 1 tsp vanil­la
  • 6 to 8 crois­sants
  • Cool Whip!

Instructions

  • Pre­heat oven to 325 deg F.
  • Whisk 2 eggs plus 4 egg yolks togeth­er. Set aside.
  • Over a low flame, com­bine 2 cups whole milk, 12 cup unsweet­ened cocoa pow­der, 1 12 cups heavy cream, 1 12 tsp cin­na­mon, and 1 tsp salt in a sauce pan until smooth.
  • Add 8 oz bit­ter­sweet choco­late, 1 12 cup sug­ar, and 1 tsp vanil­la .
  • Stir.
  • Slow­ly add milk-and-choco­late mix­ture to the eggs. Don’t be aggres­sive! (If you do, you
  • will get scram­bled eggs.)
  • But­ter an 8″ x 8″ bak­ing dish.
  • Cut 6 – 8 crois­sants into cubes and place in dish.
  • Pour choco­late mix­ture over crois­sants. Let them sit to soak up all the choco­latey good­ness. Be patient!
  • Bake at 325 degrees for 45 – 50 min­utes.
  • Scoop on some Cool Whip and eat!
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Pumpkin Muffins

Choco­late Crois­sant Bread Pud­ding
Yields 9
Eat dessert first! Inspired by Rube Gold­berg’s love of Cool Whip (and Sarah’s love of writ­ing what makes her hap­py!)
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Print
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
1 hr 5 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
1 hr 5 min
Ingre­di­ents
  1. 2 eggs plus 4 egg yolks
  2. 2 cups whole milk
  3. 12 cup unsweet­ened cocoa pow­der
  4. 1−1÷2 cups heavy cream
  5. 1−1÷2 tsp cin­na­mon
  6. 1 tsp salt
  7. 8 oz bit­ter­sweet choco­late
  8. 1−1÷2 cup sug­ar
  9. 1 tsp vanil­la
  10. 6 to 8 crois­sants
  11. Cool Whip!
Instruc­tions
  1. Pre­heat oven to 325 deg F.
  2. Whisk 2 eggs plus 4 egg yolks togeth­er. Set aside.
  3. Over a low flame, com­bine 2 cups whole milk, 12 cup unsweet­ened cocoa pow­der, 1 12 cups heavy cream, 1 12 tsp cin­na­mon, and 1 tsp salt in a sauce pan until smooth.
  4. Add 8 oz bit­ter­sweet choco­late, 1 12 cup sug­ar, and 1 tsp vanil­la .
  5. Stir.
  6. Slow­ly add milk-and-choco­late mix­ture to the eggs. Don’t be aggres­sive! (If you do, you
  7. will get scram­bled eggs.)
  8. But­ter an 8″ x 8″ bak­ing dish.
  9. Cut 6 – 8 crois­sants into cubes and place in dish.
  10. Pour choco­late mix­ture over crois­sants. Let them sit to soak up all the choco­latey good­ness. Be patient!
  11. Bake at 325 degrees for 45 – 50 min­utes.
  12. Scoop on some Cool Whip and eat!
Bookol­o­gy Mag­a­zine https://www.bookologymagazine.com/
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Squashed Fly Cookies

Choco­late Crois­sant Bread Pud­ding
Yields 9
Eat dessert first! Inspired by Rube Gold­berg’s love of Cool Whip (and Sarah’s love of writ­ing what makes her hap­py!)
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
1 hr 5 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
1 hr 5 min
Ingre­di­ents
  1. 2 eggs plus 4 egg yolks
  2. 2 cups whole milk
  3. 12 cup unsweet­ened cocoa pow­der
  4. 1−1÷2 cups heavy cream
  5. 1−1÷2 tsp cin­na­mon
  6. 1 tsp salt
  7. 8 oz bit­ter­sweet choco­late
  8. 1−1÷2 cup sug­ar
  9. 1 tsp vanil­la
  10. 6 to 8 crois­sants
  11. Cool Whip!
Instruc­tions
  1. Pre­heat oven to 325 deg F.
  2. Whisk 2 eggs plus 4 egg yolks togeth­er. Set aside.
  3. Over a low flame, com­bine 2 cups whole milk, 12 cup unsweet­ened cocoa pow­der, 1 12 cups heavy cream, 1 12 tsp cin­na­mon, and 1 tsp salt in a sauce pan until smooth.
  4. Add 8 oz bit­ter­sweet choco­late, 1 12 cup sug­ar, and 1 tsp vanil­la .
  5. Stir.
  6. Slow­ly add milk-and-choco­late mix­ture to the eggs. Don’t be aggres­sive! (If you do, you
  7. will get scram­bled eggs.)
  8. But­ter an 8″ x 8″ bak­ing dish.
  9. Cut 6 – 8 crois­sants into cubes and place in dish.
  10. Pour choco­late mix­ture over crois­sants. Let them sit to soak up all the choco­latey good­ness. Be patient!
  11. Bake at 325 degrees for 45 – 50 min­utes.
  12. Scoop on some Cool Whip and eat!
Bookol­o­gy Mag­a­zine https://www.bookologymagazine.com/
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No Trout Tomato Soup for Two

No Trout Tomato Soup for Two

After a day tromp­ing through the restored prairie, enjoy this deli­cious soup!
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time15 mins
Serv­ings: 1
Author: Jacque­line Brig­gs Mar­tin

Ingredients

  • 2 fresh toma­toes at least one cup of diced toma­toes
  • Salt and pep­per to taste
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 Tbsp flour

Instructions

  • Cut up one or two good-sized fresh toma­toes — at least one cup of cut toma­to.
  • Put it in a pot and cook slow­ly for twen­ty min­utes.
  • Add salt and pep­per to taste.
  • Put the cooked toma­to through a food mill
  • or get some­one to help you put it in a food proces­sor.
  • Stir in one cup of milk blend­ed with one Table­spoon of flour.
  • Sim­mer for 5 min­utes, or until soup has thick­ened. Pour into 2 cups — one for you, one for a friend. Enjoy.
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Potato Latkes

Potato Latkes

Whether you’re cel­e­brat­ing Hanukkah with these deli­cious treats or you’re a fan of pota­toes, you’ll want to add this easy recipe to your reper­toire. (from The Food Net­work)
Serv­ings: 4
Author: Michele Urvater

Ingredients

  • 1−1÷2 lbs rus­set pota­toes peeled
  • 14 cup fine­ly chopped shal­lots
  • 2 large eggs light­ly beat­en
  • 2 Tbsp flour or mat­zo meal may need more
  • 1−1÷2 tea­spoons salt and fresh­ly ground black pep­per
  • Veg­etable oil for fry­ing

Instructions

  • In a food proces­sor grate the pota­toes. Line a sieve with cheese­cloth and trans­fer pota­toes to the sieve. Set sieve over a bowl, twist cheese­cloth into a pouch, squeez­ing out some mois­ture. Let mix­ture drain for 15 min­utes. After 15 min­utes, pour off liq­uid from the bowl but leave the white pota­to starch that set­tles in the bot­tom of the bowl.
  • To that starch add shal­lots, eggs, flour, 1−1÷2 tea­spoons of salt and fresh­ly ground pep­per. Return drained pota­toes to this mix­ture and toss to com­bine.
  • Pre­heat oven to 200 degrees. Line a bak­ing pan with paper tow­els. When you are ready to eat, in a large skil­let heat 14 inch of oil over medi­um high heat until hot. Drop heap­ing table­spoon­fuls of pota­to mix­ture and cook for 3 to 4 min­utes a side; latkes should be gold­en and crisp on both sides. Eat right away or keep warm in oven. Serve with apple­sauce or sour cream or cot­tage cheese mixed with sour cream.
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Rosemary Shortbread Cookies

Rosemary Shortbread Cookies

We rec­om­mend giv­ing kids cook­books for the hol­i­days. Yumm. For kids who are inspired by rel­a­tives who cook, TV cook­ing shows, or their innate wish to make (and eat) good food, a cook­book will trav­el with them through­out life. (And it’s a sneaky way to encour­age read­ing and math!)

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-pur­pose flour
  • cup gran­u­lat­ed sug­ar
  • 1 table­spoon fine­ly chopped fresh rose­mary
  • 1 tea­spoon plus 1 pinch kosher salt
  • 1 cup 2 sticks unsalt­ed cold but­ter, cut into 1‑inch chunks
  • 1 to 2 tea­spoons rose­mary chest­nut or oth­er dark, full-fla­vored hon­ey (option­al)

Instructions

  • Heat oven to 325 degrees. In a food proces­sor, pulse togeth­er flour, sug­ar, rose­mary and salt. Add but­ter, and hon­ey if desired, and pulse to fine crumbs. Pulse a few more times until some crumbs start to come togeth­er, but don’t over­process. Dough should not be smooth.
  • Press dough into an ungreased 8- or 9‑inch-square bak­ing pan or 9‑inch pie pan. Prick dough all over with a fork. Bake until gold­en brown, 35 to 40 min­utes for 9‑inch pan, 45 to 50 min­utes for 8‑inch. Trans­fer to a wire rack to cool. Cut into squares, bars or wedges while still warm.

Notes

Adapt­ed from The New York Times
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Vinegar Pie

Vinegar Pie

As Martha Stew­art explains, “This dessert gets its apple-pie-like fla­vor from cider vine­gar, a tech­nique used in cov­ered wag­on days, when fresh pro­duce was scarce.” The cooks in Buf­fa­lo Bil­l’s day would have been famil­iar with this recipe. Don’t miss read­ing more about those days in Pre­sent­ing Buf­fa­lo Bill by Can­dace Flem­ing.
Prep Time35 mins
Total Time3 hrs 25 mins
Serv­ings: 8
Author: Martha Stew­art

Ingredients

  • 2 table­spoons all-pur­pose flour plus more for sur­face
  • 2 table­spoons unsalt­ed but­ter
  • 12 cup light-brown sug­ar
  • 12 tea­spoon ground cin­na­mon
  • 12 tea­spoon ground gin­ger
  • 16 tea­spoon fresh­ly grat­ed nut­meg
  • 14 tea­spoon salt
  • 2 table­spoons cider vine­gar
  • 1 cup plus 1 tea­spoon water divid­ed
  • 3 large eggs divid­ed
  • 1 table­spoon turbina­do sug­ar or sand­ing sug­ar
  • Vanil­la ice cream for serv­ing

Instructions

  • Roll out 1 disk of dough into a 12-inch round on a light­ly floured sur­face. Fit into a 9‑inch pie plate, and trim edge of dough to rim. Roll out remain­ing disk of dough to a 12-inch round. Trans­fer to a parch­ment-lined bak­ing sheet, and refrig­er­ate, along with dough in pie plate, until firm, about 1 hour.
  • Pre­heat oven to 350 degrees. Melt but­ter in a bowl set over a saucepan of sim­mer­ing water; remove from heat. Whisk in brown sug­ar, flour, spices, salt, vine­gar, and 1 cup water. Light­ly beat 2 eggs, and whisk into mix­ture. Return bowl to pan of sim­mer­ing water, and cook, stir­ring often, until mix­ture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, 10 to 12 min­utes. Remove from heat, and let cool to room tem­per­a­ture, about 20 min­utes, stir­ring occa­sion­al­ly.
  • Pour fill­ing into crust, and place top crust over fill­ing. Trim excess, leav­ing a 1/2‑inch over­hang. Fold under bot­tom crust. Press to seal, and crimp as desired. Beat remain­ing egg with remain­ing tea­spoon water; brush top of pie with egg wash, and sprin­kle with turbina­do sug­ar. Use a sharp knife to slash 6 vents radi­at­ing out from cen­ter of pie. Bake pie until gold­en and sur­face has puffed, about 45 min­utes. Let cool on a wire rack 45 min­utes. Serve slight­ly warm with ice cream.

Notes

Adapt­ed from http://www.marthastewart.com/939300/pioneer-vinegar-pie
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Slow Cooker Beef Stew

Slow Cooker Beef Stew

Inspired by our Book­storm fea­ture this month, Let Your Voice Be Heard: The Life and Times of Pete Seeger, there was a pot of stew bub­bling in many a hobo camp dur­ing the Great Depres­sion and many a hoo­te­nan­ny in the ’50s and 60s’. This quick-to-assem­ble ver­sion can stay in your slow cook­er until you’re ready to eat.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 hrs
Serv­ings: 8

Ingredients

  • 3.5 lb bone­less chuck or round or stew meat
  • 1 Tbsp Kitchen Bou­quet
  • 1 12 oz can flat beer
  • 1 enve­lope onion soup mix
  • 1 enve­lope brown gravy mix
  • 1 tsp Worces­ter­shire sauce
  • 1 can cream of mush­room soup
  • 4 cups assort­ed frozen veg­eta­bles of your choice

Instructions

  • Cut beef into 1.5” cubes. Place them in the slow cook­er and mix in Kitchen Bou­quet. Add beer, onion soup mix, brown gravy mix, and Worces­ter­shire sauce. Set pot to 200 degrees (low) and let cook for 8 to 10 hours. Stir in mush­room soup and veg­eta­bles and cook an addi­tion­al 30 to 40 min­utes. Makes about 8 serv­ings.
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Decadent Chocolate Raspberry Cake

Decadent Chocolate Raspberry Cake

Inspired by our Book­storm fea­ture this month, No Mon­keys, No Choco­late, bake this rich choco­late cake, and indulge in every sweet choco­late-rasp­ber­ry bite.
Prep Time25 mins
Cook Time2 hrs 25 mins
Total Time3 hrs
Serv­ings: 12

Ingredients

  • CAKE
  • 1 cup semi­sweet choco­late chips 6 oz
  • ½ cup but­ter or mar­garine
  • ½ cup all-pur­pose flour
  • 4 eggs sep­a­rat­ed
  • ½ cup sug­ar
  • SAUCE
  • 1 box 10 oz frozen rasp­ber­ries, thawed, drained and juice reserved
  • ¼ cup sug­ar
  • 2 Tbsp corn­starch
  • 1 to 2 Tbsp orange- or rasp­ber­ry-fla­vored liqueur if desired
  • GLAZE
  • ½ cup semi­sweet choco­late chips
  • 2 Tbsp but­ter or mar­garine
  • 2 Tbsp light corn syrup
  • GARNISH
  • ½ cup whipped cream
  • Fresh rasp­ber­ries if desired

Instructions

  • Heat oven to 325°F. Grease bot­tom and side of 8‑inch spring­form pan or 9‑inch round cake pan with short­en­ing. In 2‑quart heavy saucepan, melt 1 cup choco­late chips and 12 cup but­ter over medi­um heat, stir­ring occa­sion­al­ly. Cool 5 min­utes. Stir in flour until smooth. Stir in egg yolks until well blend­ed; set aside.
  • In large bowl, beat egg whites with elec­tric mix­er on high speed until foamy. Beat in 12 cup sug­ar, 1 table­spoon at a time, until soft peaks form. Using rub­ber spat­u­la, fold choco­late mix­ture into egg whites. Spread in pan.
  • Bake the spring­form pan 35 to 40 min­utes, round cake pan 30 to 35 min­utes, or until tooth­pick insert­ed in cen­ter comes out clean (top will appear dry and cracked). Cool 10 min­utes. Run knife along side of cake to loosen; remove side of spring­form pan. Place cool­ing rack upside down over cake; turn rack and cake over. Remove bot­tom of spring­form pan or round cake pan. Cool com­plete­ly, about 1 hour.
  • Mean­while, add enough water to reserved rasp­ber­ry juice to mea­sure 1 cup. In 1‑quart saucepan, mix 14 cup sug­ar and the corn­starch. Stir in juice and thawed rasp­ber­ries. Heat to boil­ing over medi­um heat. Boil and stir 1 minute. Place small strain­er over small bowl. Pour mix­ture through strain­er to remove seeds; dis­card seeds. Stir liqueur into mix­ture; set aside.
  • Place cake on serv­ing plate. In 1‑quart saucepan, heat glaze ingre­di­ents over medi­um heat, stir­ring occa­sion­al­ly, until chips are melt­ed. Spread over top of cake, allow­ing some to driz­zle down side. Place whipped cream in dec­o­rat­ing bag fit­ted with star tip. Pipe a rosette on each serv­ing. Serve cake with sauce. Gar­nish with fresh rasp­ber­ries.

Notes

Adapt­ed from Bet­ty Crock­er
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Louis Armstrong’s Red Beans and Rice

A Cajun-inspired favorite recipe from jazz musi­cian Louis Arm­strong, this is a per­fect accom­pa­ni­ment to your read­ing of Jazz Day by Rox­ane Orgill.

Louis and Lucille Armstrong’s Red Beans and Rice

Total Time6 hrs
Serv­ings: 8

Ingredients

  • 1 pound kid­ney beans
  • 12 pound salt pork strip of lean, strip of fat
  • 1 small can of toma­to sauce if desired
  • 6 small ham hocks or 1 smoked
  • pork butt
  • 2 onions diced
  • 14 green bell pep­per
  • 5 tiny or 2 medi­um dried pep­pers
  • 1 clove gar­lic chopped
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

  • Wash beans thor­ough­ly, then soak overnight in cold water. Be sure to cov­er beans. To cook, pour off water and add fresh water to cov­er. Add salt pork and bring to a boil in cov­ered pot. Turn flame down to slight­ly high­er than low and cook one and a half hours. Add onions, pep­pers, gar­lic and salt. Cook three hours. Add toma­to sauce and cook an hour and a half more, adding water as nec­es­sary. Beans and meat should always be cov­ered with liq­uid.
  • To pre­pare with ham hocks or pork butt, wash meat, add water to cov­er and bring to boil in cov­ered pot over medi­um flame. Cook one and a half hours. Add beans (pour water off) and rest of ingre­di­ents to meat. Cook four and a half hours. Add water as nec­es­sary.
  • Serve over or beside rice.
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Lighthouse Beef Stew

Author Aimee Bis­sonette writes, “To accom­pa­ny your read­ing of Miss Col­fax’s Light­house, here’s the type of recipe Har­ri­et would have cooked in win­ter months. It gets incred­i­bly cold on Lake Michi­gan in the win­ter and Har­ri­et was always so busy! She would have need­ed some­thing that was pret­ty easy to make (no time to fuss) but would warm her inside and out.

My sug­ges­tion: beef stew. Here’s a recipe my daugh­ters and I used to use when they were lit­tle and learn­ing to cook.”

Lighthouse Beef Stew

Meal in a pot: The fin­ished stew is rich and smooth. Sprin­kle it with chopped pars­ley and serve it with baked, boiled, or mashed pota­toes and a green veg­etable or sal­ad
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time2 hrs
Total Time3 hrs 30 mins
Serv­ings: 4
Author: Aimee Bis­sonette

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ lb beef stew meat cut into cubes
  • 3 slices of bacon
  • 2 onions
  • 1 clove gar­lic
  • 1 ¾ cups beef stock
  • 2 car­rots
  • a few strips of orange peel
  • a large pinch of Ital­ian sea­son­ing
  • 2 T veg­etable oil
  • 2 T chopped pars­ley
  • 1 T all-pur­pose flour
  • 1 T toma­to purée
  • Salt and pep­per

Instructions

  • Set the oven to 350 degrees F. Chop the onions and bacon with a sharp knife, slice the car­rots, and crush the gar­lic.
  • Mix the flour, salt and pep­per on the plate. Lay the meat on top and turn it until each piece is coat­ed with flour.
  • Heat 1 T oil in the casse­role dish and fry the car­rots and onions for a few min­utes. Remove with a slot­ted spoon.
  • Heat the rest of the oil in the casse­role dish, then add the meat and stir it as it cooks until it is light­ly browned all over.
  • Return the veg­eta­bles to the casse­role dish with the meat. Add the toma­to purée, gar­lic, herbs, and orange peel and stir.
  • Add the stock and stir. Then put the lid on the casse­role and cook it for about two hours, until the meat is ten­der.

Notes

Adapt­ed from from “The Children’s Step-by-Step Cook Book” by Angela Wilkes
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Twisted Tots Hotdish

Twisted Tots Hotdish

For a deli­cious hot dish, which Trev’s grand­moth­er may well have cooked for him, you can’t beat this slight­ly dif­fer­ent take on the Tater Tot Hot­dish. Because it’s a Min­neso­ta thing, don’t you know?
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time50 mins
Total Time1 hr
Serv­ings: 8

Ingredients

  • 1 lb very lean ground beef
  • 1 can cream of mush­room soup
  • 2 cups shred­ded sharp ched­dar
  • 14 cup diced red bell pep­per
  • 14 cup diced green bell pep­per
  • 6 strips cooked bacon crum­bled
  • 12 cup French fried onions
  • 2 cups tater tots

Instructions

  • Pre­heat oven to 350ºF
  • Press uncooked ground beef into an 11×7” bak­ing dish. Spread the tater tots even­ly on top of the ground beef. Pour the soup over the tater tots. Sprin­kle the diced bell pep­pers, bacon, and French fried onions on top of the soup. Dis­trib­ute one cup of cheese over the top.
  • Bake for 20 min­utes. Remove from oven and stir the casse­role, break­ing the meat into chunks. Add the rest of the cheese and cook for an addi­tion­al 20 to 30 min­utes until top of casse­role looks as entic­ing as you’d like it to look.
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Pork Roll Sandwich

Pork Roll Sandwich

One of New Jer­sey’s most famous foods, the Pork Roll sand­wich is made from John Tay­lor’s Pork Roll, first made in 1856. It’s a lot like SPAM, but dif­fer­ent, but to make this recipe, if you can’t find Tay­lor Pork Roll, you can cut SPAM very thin­ly and use it instead.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time20 mins
Serv­ings: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 slices Pork Roll about 6 ounces
  • 2 Tbsp unsalt­ed but­ter
  • 4 Kaiser rolls split in half and toast­ed
  • 4 large eggs
  • Kosher salt and fresh­ly ground black pep­per
  • 4 slices Amer­i­can cheese
  • Ketchup if you like

Instructions

  • Score the edges of the pork roll slices in 3 or 4 places. This will keep the slices flat and pre­vent them from buck­ling as they cook.
  • Heat the but­ter in a large non­stick skil­let over medi­um-high heat. Add the pork slices in one lay­er and brown well on both sides, about 6 min­utes. Remove the slices and place one on top of each toast­ed roll bot­tom.
  • Reduce the heat to medi­um-low and crack the eggs into the skil­let. Break each yolk with the cor­ner of your spat­u­la. Sprin­kle with salt and pep­per. After about 2 min­utes, flip the eggs and con­tin­ue cook­ing on the oth­er side. Imme­di­ate­ly place a slice of Amer­i­can cheese on top of each egg. Cov­er with a lid to melt the cheese, about 30 sec­onds.
  • Place each egg and cheese quad­rant on top of a browned pork roll slice. At this point you can squeeze ketchup on top if desired. Top with the oth­er half of the roll.

Notes

We think per­haps poet and Dr. William Car­los Williams would have eat­en this sand­wich at least once, being from New Jer­sey. You might find this arti­cle inter­est­ing because it gives the his­to­ry of the sand­wich as well as places where you might enjoy the sand­wich when you vis­it New Jer­sey. http://bit.ly/20VqvVs
Adapt­ed from from The Cook­ing Chan­nel
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Sunflower Cat Treats

Sunflower Cat Treats

Here’s a pop­u­lar home­made treat your cat will enjoy! You’ll need a dehy­dra­tor to pre­pare these.
Author: Rodale Well­ness

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup sun­flower seeds
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ cup chopped apples
  • ¼ cup car­rots peas, or oth­er veg­eta­bles
  • ¼ cup oats ground to a pow­der
  • 1 cup peanut but­ter
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1 cup molasses

Instructions

  • Com­bine all ingre­di­ents but molasses in a large bowl; add molasses and work in until dough is stiff. Addi­tion­al oats may be added to make the dough stiff.
  • Roll out dough and cut into shapes or squares.
  • Dehy­drate at the high­est set­ting — 145 to 155 degrees — until done, for approx­i­mate­ly 4 hours.
  • These treats should be very dry, so add time as nec­es­sary.
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Kung Pao Chicken with Broccoli

Kung Pao Chicken with Broccoli

In hon­or of Jing’s deli­cious cook­ing in Chas­ing Secrets, here’s a favorite recipe.
Cook Time12 hrs
Serv­ings: 4

Ingredients

  • 3 Tbsp water
  • 2 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp corn­starch
  • 1 Tbsp dry sher­ry
  • 1 tsp sug­ar
  • 2 bone­less chick­en breast halves skinned and cubed
  • 1 Tbsp corn­starch
  • 4 Tbsp peanut oil
  • 6 dried hot red chilies or ¼ tsp dried red pep­per flakes
  • 5 green onions chopped
  • 2 gar­lic cloves minced
  • 1 tsp minced peeled, fresh gin­ger
  • 3 cups small broc­coli flo­rets
  • ½ cup salt­ed peanuts
  • fresh­ly cooked rice

Instructions

  • Blend first 5 ingre­di­ents in bowl. Set sauce aside. Toss chick­en with 1 Tbsp corn­starch to coat. Heat 2 Tbsp oil in wok or heavy large skil­let over high heat. Add chilies and cook until black­ened, about 2 min­utes. Add chick­en and cook until browned, stir­ring fre­quent­ly, 1 to 2 min­utes. Remove chick­en using slot­ted spoon. Set aside.
  • Add remain­ing 2 Tbsp oil to wok. Add green onions, gar­lic, and gin­ger and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add broc­coli and stir-fry 2 min­utes. Stir sauce and add to wok. Cov­er and cook until sauce is thick­ened and broc­coli is crisp-ten­der, about 3 min­utes. Mix in chick­en and peanuts and heat through. Serve imme­di­ate­ly with rice.
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Princess Posey’s Crazy Lazy Vacation Cookies

Princess Posey’s Crazy Lazy Vacation Cookies

If you like crispy, crunchy cook­ies and the taste of almonds, you’ll love these!
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time35 mins
Serv­ings: 12
Author: Stephanie Greene

Ingredients

  • 1 ¾ cups sliced almonds
  • 1 cup confectioner’s sug­ar
  • 2 large egg whites
  • Grat­ed peel of one orange or to taste
  • ½ tea­spoon pure almond extract

Instructions

  • Pre­heat oven to 350 degrees. Spread almonds in a sin­gle lay­er on a rimmed bak­ing sheet and toast in oven until light­ly browned and fra­grant, 7 to 9 min­utes. Remove from oven; let cool.
  • Com­bine almonds and sug­ar in food proces­sor and grind to a fine pow­der. Trans­fer to a medi­um bowl. In a sep­a­rate bowl, beat eggs whites until stiff peaks form. (Tip: if you beat the whites in a bowl over sim­mer­ing water, they’ll beat faster. You can do it by hand or with a mix­er. It’s fun!)
  • Fold egg whites into almond mix­ture; fold in almond extract; fold in grat­ed orange peel.
  • Line a bak­ing sheet with parch­ment paper. Trans­fer almond mix­ture to a pas­try bag fit­ted with a ½‑inch plain tip.* Pipe twen­ty 2‑inch rings onto pre­pared sheet, about 1 inch apart. Bake until gold­en brown and firm to the touch, about 25 min­utes.
  • Remove from oven and imme­di­ate­ly trans­fer to a wire rack to cool com­plete­ly.

Notes

If you don’t have a pas­try bag, you can cut the cor­ner off a large plas­tic bag and use it. It’s not per­fect, but it works.
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Kim-Chee

Kim-Chee

Prep Time7 mins
Cook Time1 d
Serv­ings: 4
Author: Guy Fieri

Ingredients

  • 12 medi­um head napa cab­bage uncored, rough­ly chopped
  • 1 Tbsp kosher salt
  • 1 cup car­rot juli­enned, match­stick size
  • 1 cup daikon radish juli­enned, match­stick size
  • 2 green onions split in half, cut in 2″ sec­tions
  • 34 cup tamari soy sauce
  • 12 cup water
  • 14 cup apple cider vine­gar
  • 2 Tbsp minced gar­lic
  • 1 Tbsp hon­ey
  • 4 dry hot chile pep­pers split length­wise, seeds removed

Instructions

  • In a colan­der in the sink, sprin­kle cab­bage with salt and toss to com­bine. Let sit about 1 12 hours or until cab­bage wilts. Rinse sev­er­al times with cold water and drain well. Squeeze out any excess water. Com­bine cab­bage with car­rots, radish and green onions. In a small bowl, mix togeth­er soy sauce, water, vine­gar, gar­lic, hon­ey and chile pep­pers. Place cab­bage mix­ture in a clean glass jar or glass bowl (about 1 quart or larg­er). Pour liq­uid over cab­bage and place in refrig­er­a­tor or cool dark place for 24 hours.
  • Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/guy-fieri/kim-chee-ks-way-recipe.html?oc=linkback
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Best Ever Banana Pudding

Best Ever Banana Pudding

A South­ern-style banana pud­ding that’s a fit­ting treat while you’re read­ing Ani­ta Sil­vey’s Untamed: the Wild Life of Jane Goodall
Serv­ings: 9
Author: Stephanie Har­ris

Ingredients

  • 34 cup sug­ar
  • 14 cup all-pur­pose flour
  • 14 tsp salt
  • 3 cups 2% milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 1−1÷2 tsp vanil­la extract
  • 8 oz vanil­la wafers about 60, divid­ed
  • 4 large ripe bananas, peeled, cut into 14″ slices

Instructions

  • In a large saucepan, mix sug­ar, flour and salt. Whisk in milk. Cook and stir over medi­um heat until thick­ened and bub­bly. Reduce heat to low; cook and stir 2 min­utes longer. Remove from heat.
  • In a small bowl, whisk eggs. Whisk a small amount of hot mix­ture into eggs; return all to pan, whisk­ing con­stant­ly. Bring to a gen­tle boil; cook and stir 2 min­utes. Remove from heat. Stir in vanil­la. Cool 15 min­utes, stir­ring occa­sion­al­ly.
  • In an ungreased 8‑in.-square bak­ing dish, lay­er 25 vanil­la wafers, half of the banana slices and half of the pud­ding. Repeat lay­ers
  • Press plas­tic wrap onto sur­face of pud­ding. Refrig­er­ate 4 hours or overnight. Just before serv­ing, crush remain­ing wafers and sprin­kle over top.

Notes

If you aren’t famil­iar with Taste of Home, it’s a great source for tried-and-true home cook­ing.
Adapt­ed from Taste of Home
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Flowerpot Cakes

Flowerpot Cakes

We used six unglazed, untreat­ed ter­ra-cot­ta flow­er­pots (each with a six-ounce capac­i­ty, about 3 inch­es tall and 3 12 inch­es across the top). Thor­ough­ly wash the new pots in hot water before using.
Serv­ings: 6

Ingredients

  • 13 cup veg­etable oil plus more for pots
  • 34 cup unsweet­ened cocoa pow­der plus more for dust­ing
  • 12 cups all-pur­pose flour
  • 12 cups sug­ar
  • 12 tea­spoons bak­ing soda
  • 34 tea­spoon bak­ing pow­der
  • 34 tea­spoon salt
  • 1 large egg plus 1 large egg yolk
  • 34 cup but­ter­milk
  • 34 tea­spoon pure vanil­la extract
  • Quick Choco­late Frost­ing
  • 12 cup crushed choco­late wafer cook­ies about 10, for gar­nish
  • Mul­ti­col­ored peb­ble-shaped choco­late can­dies for gar­nish
  • Mint sprigs for gar­nish

Instructions

  • Pre­heat oven to 350 degrees. Brush inside of each flow­er­pot with oil, and line bot­tom with parch­ment paper round. Brush parch­ment with oil, and light­ly dust with cocoa.
  • Sift cocoa, flour, sug­ar, bak­ing soda, bak­ing pow­der, and salt into the bowl of an elec­tric mix­er fit­ted with the pad­dle attach­ment. Add egg and yolk, 34 cup warm water, but­ter­milk, oil, and vanil­la; mix on low speed until smooth, about 1 minute.
  • Divide bat­ter among pre­pared pots, fill­ing each about two-thirds full. Trans­fer to a rimmed bak­ing sheet. Bake, rotat­ing sheet about halfway through, until a cake tester insert­ed into cen­ters comes out clean, 45 to 50 min­utes. Let cakes cool com­plete­ly in the flow­er­pots on a wire rack.
  • Frost cakes with an off­set spat­u­la; sprin­kle with crushed cook­ies. Top with can­dies; “plant” 1 mint sprig in each cake.

Notes

At a spring con­fer­ence we orga­nized back in 2004, Karen Ritz, author, illus­tra­tor, and bak­er extra­or­di­naire, made one of these for each of our guests. They were a hit! We think they’d work well with a con­struc­tion-themed par­ty or sto­ry­time, too.
Adapt­ed from from Martha Stew­art’s web­site
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Orange Omelet

Gen­nifer Chold­enko’s Chas­ing Secrets takes place in the late 1800s — this recipe is one that might have been served at a lun­cheon. From the Boston Cook­ing School Cook­book:

Orange Omelet

orange slicesIngre­di­ents:
3 eggs
Few grains salt
1 tea­spoon lemon juice
12 table­spoons orange juice
12 table­spoon but­ter (for pan)
2 oranges
2 table­spoons pow­dered sug­ar

Sep­a­rate yolks from whites. Beat yolks until thick and lemon col­ored; add salt, lemon juice and orange juice. Beat whites until stiff and dry, cut­ting and fold­ing them into the first mix­ture until they have tak­en up mix­ture.

Heat pan, and but­ter sides and bot­tom. Turn in mix­ture, spread even­ly, place on range where it will cook slow­ly. When well “puffed” and del­i­cate­ly browned under­neath, place pan on cen­ter grate of 350°F oven to fin­ish cook­ing. Omelet is cooked when firm to the touch when pressed by the fin­ger.

Remove skin from oranges and cut in slices, length­wise. Fold in one-third of the slices of orange, well sprin­kled with pow­dered sug­ar; put remain­ing slices around omelet, and sprin­kle with sug­ar.

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Dinosaur Eggs

 

Dinosaur Eggs

When you’re done with a day of tromp­ing through the pri­mor­dial savan­nah, on the look­out for dinosaurs, have some of these on hand for your avid dinosaur fans.
Prep Time35 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time1 hr
Serv­ings: 6
Author: Deneen Flow­ers

Ingredients

  • 6 medi­um hard-boiled eggs
  • 1.5 lbs ground spicy sausage
  • 12 cup bread crumbs
  • 14 tsp gar­lic pow­der
  • 14 tsp pep­per
  • 2 Tbsp canola oil
  • Hot sauce option­al
  • Brown mus­tard option­al

Instructions

  • Peel boiled eggs. Mix sea­son­ings and bread crumbs togeth­er.
  • Divide sausage into six equal amounts.
  • Flat­ten sausage into thin pat­ties and wrap around eggs.
  • Roll each egg in bread crumbs.
  • Heat oil in skil­let.
  • Fry eggs in hot oil until well browned, turn­ing fre­quent­ly.
  • May also be baked in oven at 325 deg F for 25 min­utes or until browned
  • Serve with hot sauce or mus­tard if desired.

Notes

Adapt­ed from allthecooks.com
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Garlic Beef Enchiladas

Garlic Beef Enchiladas

Yum­my home-made enchi­ladas with a sub­tle kick of fla­vor.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time40 mins
Total Time1 hr 10 mins
Serv­ings: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 medi­um onion chopped
  • 2 Tbsp all-pur­pose flour
  • 1 Tbsp chili pow­der
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp gar­lic pow­der
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • ¼ tsp rubbed sage
  • 1 can 14.5 oz stewed toma­toes

SAUCE

  • 4 to 6 gar­lic cloves minced
  • 13 cup but­ter
  • 12 cup all-pur­pose flour
  • 1 can 14½ oz beef broth
  • 1 can 15 oz toma­to sauce
  • 1 to 2 Tbsp chili pow­der
  • 1 to 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 to 2 tsp rubbed sage
  • 12 tsp salt
  • 10 flour tor­tillas 7‑inches round
  • 2 cups 8 oz shred­ded Col­by-Jack cheese

Instructions

  • In a large saucepan, cook beef and onion over medi­um heat until meat is no longer pink; drain. Stir in flour and sea­son­ings until blend­ed. Stir in toma­toes; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cov­er and sim­mer for 15 min­utes.
  • Mean­while, in anoth­er saucepan, sauté gar­lic in but­ter until ten­der. Stir in flour until blend­ed. Grad­u­al­ly stir in broth; bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 min­utes or until thick­ened. Stir in toma­to sauce and sea­son­ings; heat through.
  • Pour about 1−1÷2 cups sauce into ungreased 13“x9“x2” bak­ing dish. Spread about 14 cup beef mix­ture down the cen­ter of each tor­tilla; top with 1 – 2 Tbsp cheese. Roll up tight­ly; place seam side down over sauce in the bak­ing dish. Fin­ish fill­ing, rolling, and plac­ing all 10 tor­tillas. Top with the remain­ing suace.
  • Cov­er and bake at 350 deg for 30 – 35 min­utes. Sprin­kle with remain­ing cheese. Bake, uncov­ered, 10 to 15 min­utes longer or until the cheese is melt­ed.

Notes

Adapt­ed from Jen­nifer Stan­dridge, Taste of Home
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Birdy’s Lentil Soup

Karen Cush­man passed along this recipe from the Cookin’ Canuck with the note that it was just the sort of cold weath­er meal that would grace tables in the Cather­ine, Called Birdy world.

Hearty Lentil Soup

Just what Birdy would have eat­en!
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time1 hr 5 mins
Author: The Cookin’ Canuck

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 12 large onion chopped
  • 2 large stalks cel­ery diced
  • 2 cloves gar­lic minced
  • 2 tsp smoked papri­ka
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 14 oz. can diced toma­toes
  • 1 cup dried brown lentils
  • 34 cup low-sodi­um veg­etable or chick­en broth divid­ed
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 14 oz. black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 14 cup chopped pars­ley
  • Salt and pep­per to taste

Instructions

  • Heat olive oil in a large sauce pan set over medi­um heat. Add onions and cel­ery and cook, stir­ring occa­sion­al­ly, until the veg­eta­bles are begin­ning to soft­en, 6 to 7 min­utes.
  • Add gar­lic, smoked papri­ka and bay leaves and sauté for 30 sec­onds.
  • Stir in diced toma­toes with juices, lentils, 3 cups veg­etable or chick­en broth and 3 cups water. Increase heat to medi­um-high and bring the mix­ture to a boil. Reduce the heat slight­ly and cook, stir­ring occa­sion­al­ly, until lentils are ten­der, 25 to 35 min­utes.
  • Remove from the heat and let cool for about 10 min­utes. Remove and dis­card the bay leaves. Trans­fer half of the lentil mix­ture, half of the black beans and 3f4 cup veg­etable or chick­en broth to the bowl of a blender or food proces­sor. Pulse until com­bined, but not pureed. It should be a chunky tex­ture.
  • Pour the blender mix­ture back into the lentils in the saucepan, along with the remain­ing 1 cup of chick­en broth and remain­ing black beans. Stir and reheat over medi­um heat. Stir in pars­ley. Sea­son with salt and pep­per to taste. Serve.
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Steve’s Spaghetti Sauce

In Leroy Ninker Sad­dles Up Maybelline’s favorite food is spaghet­ti. Here we share our best recipe for a savory sauce to top any pas­ta. Serves four (or one hun­gry horse).

Steve’s Spaghetti Sauce

The secret of this savory spaghet­ti sauce is the pep­per­oni.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time45 mins
Serv­ings: 4
Author: Steven Palmquist

Ingredients

  • 1 15- oz can toma­to sauce
  • 1 6- oz can toma­to paste
  • ¼ cup sher­ry or white wine
  • 1 tsp beef stock con­cen­trate such as Bet­ter Than Bouil­lon®
  • 7 oz 12 pkg turkey pep­per­oni or reg­u­lar
  • 2 tsp gar­lic salt
  • 1 Tbsp dried pars­ley
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil

Instructions

  • Using a microwave-safe plate, arrange 7 oz. (approx. 30 pieces) of pep­per­oni (or what­ev­er quan­ti­ty will fit on plate with­out much over­lap­ping) on top of two lay­ers of paper tow­els. Microwave at full pow­er for 4 to 5 min­utes, watch­ing to make sure the pep­per­oni does­n’t burn.
  • Remove pep­per­oni from plate and allow 10 min­utes to cool, then pul­ver­ize in food mill or fine­ly chop.
  • Place all ingre­di­ents in a Dutch oven or saucepan.
  • Bring to a boil, then low­er the heat and sim­mer for 30 min­utes, cov­ered.
  • Fin­ish this sauce off by sim­mer­ing meat­balls or ground beef in it, then serv­ing over pas­ta, top­ping off with fresh­ly grat­ed Parme­sano Reg­giano cheese.
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