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Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr

Ramadan is observed dur­ing the ninth month of the Islam­ic cal­en­dar, based on the cycles of the moon. When a reli­gious leader sees the first sliv­er of a cres­cent moon, the begin­ning of Ramadan is pro­claimed. Indi­vid­u­als reflect on their spir­i­tu­al growth, make sac­ri­fices, and feel a sense of uni­ty in know­ing that Mus­lims around the world are respect­ing the Five Pil­lars of Islam: Sha­ha­da, hav­ing faith in the Islam reli­gion, Salat, pray­ing five times per day fac­ing the direc­tion of Mec­ca, Zakat, giv­ing sup­port to the needy, Sawm, fast­ing from sunup to sun­down dur­ing Ramadan, and Hajj: mak­ing the pil­grim­age to Mec­ca at least once dur­ing one’s life­time. At the end of Ramadan, a three-day spir­i­tu­al cel­e­bra­tion known as Eid al-Fitr occurs. Dur­ing this time, Mus­lims rejoice in the com­ple­tion of the fast with fam­i­ly mem­bers and friends gath­er­ing to pray and feast. Dona­tions are made to the poor and dis­ad­van­taged. Mus­lims attend prayers in the morn­ing, and then vis­it fam­i­ly, friends, and neigh­bors, giv­ing small gifts. If you observe Ramadan, con­sid­er these books as a part of your time togeth­er. All read­ers will enjoy learn­ing more about Ramadan and the friends and neigh­bors who hon­or the hol­i­day.

Best Eid Ever  

Best Eid Ever
writ­ten by Asma Mobin-Uddin
illus­trat­ed by Lau­ra Jacob­sen
Boyds Mills Press, 2007

This Eid, Aneesa should be hap­py. But, her par­ents are thou­sands of miles away for the Hajj pil­grim­age. To cheer her up, her Non­ni gives her a gift of beau­ti­ful clothes, one out­fit for each of the three days of Eid. At the prayer hall, Aneesa meets two sis­ters who are dressed in ill-fit­ting clothes for the hol­i­day. She soon dis­cov­ers that the girls are refugees. They had to leave every­thing behind when they left their native coun­try to live in Amer­i­ca. Aneesa, who can’t stop think­ing about what Eid must be like for them, comes up with a plan, a plan to help make it the best Eid hol­i­day ever.

Gift of Ramadan

 

Gift of Ramadan
writ­ten by Rabi­ah York Lum­bard
illus­trat­ed by Lau­ra K. Hor­ton
Albert Whit­man, 2019

Sophia wants to fast for Ramadan this year. She tries to keep busy through­out the day so she won’t think about food. But when the smell of cook­ies is too much, she breaks her fast ear­ly. How can she be part of the fes­tiv­i­ties now?

Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns  

Gold­en Domes and Sil­ver Lanterns: a Mus­lim Book of Col­ors
writ­ten Hena Khan
illus­trat­ed by Mehrdokht Ami­ni
Chron­i­cle Books, 2015

Red is the rug / Dad kneels on to pray, / fac­ing toward Mec­ca, / five times a day.” Gold­en Domes and Sil­ver Lanterns beau­ti­ful­ly cap­tures the world of Islam, cel­e­brat­ing its tra­di­tions, includ­ing Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr, for even the youngest read­ers.

Lailah's Lunchbox  

Lailah’s Lunch­box: a Ramadan Sto­ry
writ­ten by Reem Faruqi
illus­trat­ed by Lea Lyon
Tilbury House, 2015

Lailah is in a new school in a new coun­try, thou­sands of miles from her old home, and miss­ing her old friends. When Ramadan begins, she is excit­ed that she is final­ly old enough to par­tic­i­pate in the fast­ing but wor­ried that her class­mates won’t under­stand why she doesn’t join them in the lunch­room.

Moon Watchers  

Moon Watch­ers: Shirin’s Ramadan Mir­a­cle
writ­ten by Reza Jalali
illus­trat­ed by Anne Sib­ley O’Brien
Tilbury House, 2017

Look­ing through the tall trees in their back­yard in Maine, Shirin and her dad search for a glimpse of the new moon, the sign that the month of Ramadan has begun. Ramadan is a time when Mus­lims around the world pray, fast, and pay spe­cial atten­tion to doing good deeds. Shirin is nine and thinks she should be able to fast like her old­er broth­er Ali, but her par­ents feel she is still too young to go with­out food and water all day. When Shirin catch­es Ali sneak­ing food after school, she won­ders: Should she tat­tle or is this an oppor­tu­ni­ty for a good deed? Shirin feels left out when the oth­ers break their fasts to have their own meals after dark and in the ear­ly morn­ing, before it is light again. But then her grand­moth­er tells a sto­ry that shows her a way she can feel more a part of Ramadan and the tra­di­tions and close­ness her fam­i­ly enjoys dur­ing this spe­cial month of the year. Her good deeds result in a sur­prise for every­one!

My Grandma and Me  

My Grand­ma and Me
writ­ten by Mina Hava­herbin
illus­trat­ed by Lind­sey Yankey
Can­dlewick Press, 2019

This gen­tle sto­ry of Mina and her grand­moth­er takes the read­er through their cel­e­bra­tion of Ramadan at a mosque in Iran. It’s a cel­e­bra­tion of an inter­gen­er­a­tional fam­i­ly and their lov­ing bonds. Ear­li­er, we rec­om­mend­ed this book in Read­ing Ahead.

Night of the Moon  

Night of the Moon: a Mus­lim Hol­i­day Sto­ry
writ­ten by Hena Khan
illus­trat­ed by Julie Paschkis
Chron­i­cle Books, 2008

Yas­meen, a sev­en-year-old Pak­istani-Amer­i­can girl, cel­e­brates the Mus­lim hol­i­days of Ramadan, “The Night of the Moon” (Chaand Raat), and Eid. With lush illus­tra­tions that evoke Islam­ic art, this beau­ti­ful sto­ry offers a win­dow into mod­ern Mus­lim cul­ture — and into the ancient roots from which its tra­di­tions have grown.

Party in Ramadan  

Par­ty in Ramadan
writ­ten by Asma Mobin-Uddin, MD
illus­trat­ed by Lau­ra Jacob­sen
Boyds Mills Press, 2009

Leena is excit­ed about Ramadan. She’s too young to fast every day dur­ing the Mus­lim reli­gious fes­ti­val. Instead, she decides to fast every Fri­day dur­ing the month of Ramadan. When Leena receives an invi­ta­tion to a par­ty which hap­pens to fall on Fri­day, she has a dilem­ma. She does­n’t want to miss the par­ty, but she does­n’t want to miss fast­ing either. So Leena decides to go to the par­ty, but not eat or drink any­thing at all. Lat­er, she will join her fam­i­ly for the meal known as iftar, when the dai­ly fast is bro­ken. But when Leena, who is the only Mus­lim at the par­ty, sees her friends enjoy­ing fresh lemon­ade and choco­late cake, her stom­ach starts to growl and her head begins to hurt. Will she keep her Ramadan fast?

Ramadan  

Ramadan
writ­ten by Han­nah Eliot
illus­trat­ed by Rashin Kheiriveh
Simon & Schus­ter, 2018

In the ninth month of the year, when the first cres­cent moon ris­es in the sky, it’s time to cel­e­brate Ramadan! In this love­ly board book with age-appro­pri­ate and beau­ti­ful illus­tra­tions, read­ers learn that Ramadan is a time to reflect on our­selves, to be thank­ful, and a time to help oth­ers.

Ramadan Moon  

Ramadan Moon
writ­ten by Na’ima B. Robert
illus­trat­ed by Shirin Adl
Frances Lin­coln Children’s Books, 2009

Mus­lims all over the world observe Ramadan and the joy­ful days of Eid-al-Fitr at the end of the month of fast­ing as the most spe­cial time of year. This lyri­cal and inspir­ing pic­ture book cap­tures the won­der and delight of this great annu­al event. Accom­pa­nied by illus­tra­tions inspired by Iran­ian art, the sto­ry fol­lows the wax­ing of the moon from the first new cres­cent to full moon and wan­ing until Eid is her­ald­ed by the first sight­ing of the sec­ond new moon. This book is for all chil­dren who cel­e­brate Ramadan and those in the wider com­mu­ni­ties who want to under­stand why it is such a spe­cial expe­ri­ence for Mus­lims.

Rashad's Ramadan  

Rashad’s Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr
writ­ten by Lisa Bullard
illus­trat­ed by Hol­li Con­ger
Mill­brook Press, 2012

For Mus­lims, Ramadan is a time for fast­ing, prayer, and think­ing of oth­ers. Rashad tries to be good all month. When it’s time for Eid al-Fitr, he feasts and plays! This book is a good intro­duc­tion to the obser­vance of Ramadan for young Mus­lim chil­dren and the wider com­mu­ni­ty.

Time to Pray  

Time to Pray
writ­ten by Maha Addasi
illus­trat­ed by Ned Gan­non
Boyds Mills Press, 2010

In the Mid­dle East, Yas­min is vis­it­ing her grand­moth­er, who teach­es her about Ramadan. They pick out fab­ric for spe­cial prayer clothes and a small rug. Grand­moth­er Teta sews her the clothes, prac­tices the prayers with her, and takes her to the mosque. Yas­min is wor­ried that she doesn’t have a mosque near her home in the Unit­ed States, so she won’t know when it’s time to pray. Her grand­moth­er has a solu­tion that she sends home with Yas­min in her suit­case.

White Nights of Ramadan  

White Nights of Ramadan
writ­ten by Maha Addasi
illus­trat­ed by Ned Gan­non
Boyds Mills Press, 2017

Mid-Ramadan is a spe­cial time for fam­i­lies in the Ara­bi­an (Per­sian) Gulf. These mid­dle days are known as “the three whites,” because they include the day of the full moon, the day before, and the day after. It’s a time when chil­dren dress in tra­di­tion­al cloth­ing and go from house to house col­lect­ing treats from their neigh­bors. When Noor sees the full moon ris­ing, sig­nal­ing the com­ing of Gir­gian, she and her broth­ers pre­pare for the fun. Togeth­er, they dec­o­rate the bags they’ll car­ry to col­lect the can­dies. But along with the fun, Noor remem­bers the true mean­ing of Ramadan: spend­ing time with fam­i­ly and shar­ing with those less for­tu­nate.

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Quirky Book Lists: Time

Mar­garet Wise Brown once wrote that chil­dren won­dered about “mys­te­ri­ous clock time.” I cer­tain­ly did as a child. I sim­ply could not learn to tell time. This was back in the dark ages of ana­log clocks that seemed to hold secrets oth­ers could deci­pher but elud­ed me. I could have used any of the books on this list, but one in par­tic­u­lar is per­fect.

Time surged in impor­tance at the end of the old cen­tu­ry. We were ner­vous about what would hap­pen to our com­put­ers (remem­ber Y2K?). The com­ing mil­len­ni­um weighed as heav­i­ly as a tipped-over grand­fa­ther clock. But when Jan­u­ary 1, 2000, tripped over, we sailed into the new cen­tu­ry. Here is a list of children’s books about time from 1999 to 2019.

Story of Clocks and Calendars  

The Sto­ry of Clocks and Cal­en­dars: Mark­ing a Mil­len­ni­um
writ­ten by Bet­sy Mae­stro
illus­trat­ed by Giulio Mae­stro
Lothrop, Lee & Shep­ard, 1999

A stick­er on the cov­er announces, The Book for the Year 2000. The book asks the ques­tion, “How can it be the year 2000?” and then describes what a year is. A voy­age through time cov­ers the time mark­ers like Stone­henge, the con­stel­la­tions, and cal­en­dars adopt­ed by dif­fer­ent cul­tures, fin­ish­ing up with the his­to­ry of clocks.

What Time Is It, Mr. Crocodile?

 

What Time Is It, Mr. Croc­o­dile?
writ­ten by Judy Sier­ra
illus­trat­ed by Doug Cush­man
Houghton Mif­flin Har­court, 2004

Mr. Croc­o­dile plans his day from wak­ing up at 9:00 a.m. to singing a lul­la­by to him­self at 8:00 p.m. His biggest goal is to catch, cook, and eat five pesky mon­keys that derail his day. His best-laid sched­ule is knocked hilar­i­ous­ly awry in this rhyming pic­ture book.

Clock Struck One  

The Clock Struck One
writ­ten by Trudy Har­ris
illus­trat­ed by Car­rie Hart­man
Scholas­tic, 2004.

A ram­bunc­tious take on the famil­iar nurs­ery rhyme has the mouse run­ning up the clock. But he’s fol­lowed by a cat crav­ing mouse-tail tea. Soon a barn­yard of ani­mals joins the chase that spills from the house all the way into town. Sharp-eyed read­ers can spot var­i­ous types of clocks through­out the sto­ry. Ana­log and dig­i­tal clocks are reviewed in the back mat­ter.

About Time  

About Time: A First Look at Time and Clocks
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Bruce Kosciel­ni­ak
Houghton Mif­flin Har­court, 2004

Time-keep­ing through the ages cov­er­ing amaz­ing ear­ly locks like water clocks, shad­ow clocks, oil clocks, tur­ret clocks, medieval alarm clocks, up through mod­ern time pieces. The con­cept of time is explained through solar and lunar cycles.

House with a Clock in Its Walls  

The House with a Clock in Its Walls
writ­ten by John Bel­lairs
illus­trat­ed by Edward Gorey
Puf­fin Books, 2004

The first Lewis Bar­navelt book was pub­lished in 1973, reis­sued in 2004 in advance of the 2018 movie. Lewis lives with his magi­cian uncle, who lives next door to Mrs. Zim­mer­man, also a magi­cian. Dab­bling in mag­ic him­self, Lewis inad­ver­tent­ly calls up the for­mer own­er of the house, who built a dooms­day clock into the walls. Read the book, for­get the movie.

Invention of Hugo Cabret  

The Inven­tion of Hugo Cabret
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Bri­an Selznick
Scholas­tic, 2007

An orphan boy keeps the clocks run­ning in a Paris train sta­tion. His secret life behind the walls is inter­rupt­ed by a strange girl and an old man who also occu­py the train sta­tion. Read the ele­gant book, then watch the equal­ly-ele­gant movie.

Time is When  

Time Is When
writ­ten by Beth Gle­ick
illus­trat­ed by Marthe Joce­lyn
Tun­dra Books, 2008

Orig­i­nal­ly pub­lished in 1960, Time Is When was reis­sued with new illus­tra­tions in 2004. This pic­ture book tack­les the con­cept of “from before to now; from now to lat­er.” A delight­ful­ly diverse cast parades through sec­onds, min­utes, hours, days, weeks, months, and years in Jocelyn’s paper and fab­ric col­lages.

 

Just a Second  

Just a Sec­ond: A Dif­fer­ent Way to Look at Time
w
rit­ten and illus­trat­ed by Steve Jenk­ins
Houghton Mif­flin Har­court, 2011

Sim­ple back­grounds show­case Jenk­ins’ col­lage art paired with lit­tle-known facts based on units of time. Did you know a bat can make 200 high-pitched calls in a sec­ond? The sun trav­els half a mil­lion miles in one hour? Glob­al warm­ing caus­es seas to rise an eighth of an inch a year? Fac­toid fans will devour this book. The sci­ence will aston­ish them … and make them think.

Noisy Clock Shop  

The Noisy Clock Shop
writ­ten by Jean Hor­ton Berg
illus­trat­ed by Art Sei­den
Gros­set & Dun­lap, 2015

Part of G‑D Vin­tage, this book first appeared in 1950, revive in a larg­er for­mat. Mr. Winky repairs clocks. When a vis­it­ing friend says his shop is too noisy, Mr. Winky search­es for a qui­et place. Not the city, not the train, not the farm, not even the woods. The only place Mr. Winky feels at home is his cheer­ful, tock­ing clock shop.

Secret Keepers  

The Secret Keep­ers
writ­ten by Tren­ton Lee Stew­art
Lit­tle Brown, 2016

Reuben is thrilled when he finds an antique watch that, odd­ly, needs to be wound every fif­teen min­utes. Then he dis­cov­ers its secret, life-chang­ing pow­ers. Then he finds him­self up against The Smoke, a devi­ous vil­lain. Watch­mak­er Mrs. Genevieve and a girl from the past try to help Reuben, but his new-found pow­ers are more than he can han­dle.

Fix That Clock  

Fix That Clock
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Kurt Cyrus
Houghton Mif­flin Har­court, 2019

A derelict clock tow­er is home to bats, owls, pigeons and mice. Then a deter­mined crew steps in to rebuild the tow­er and get the clock work­ing again. Brisk rhyme packed with con­struc­tion sounds prod read­ers to fol­low the remod­el­ing … and the oust­ed ani­mals. Wood scraps inspire unique con­dos in a sur­prise end­ing.

Telling Time  

Telling Time
writ­ten by David A. Adler
illus­trat­ed by Edward Miller
Hol­i­day House, 2019

Four astro­naut kids, two robots, and one Mar­t­ian spend a day in space. Each stage of their trip explains sec­onds, min­utes, hours, A.M. and P.M., noon and mid­night, dig­i­tal and ana­log clocks, time zones, mil­i­tary time, and — most impor­tant—how to tell time. This is the book I need­ed when I was a kid. Learn­ing to tell time has nev­er been so much fun, and so easy to under­stand.

Crossing on Time  

Cross­ing on Time:
Steam Engines, Fast Ships, and a Jour­ney to the New World
w
rit­ten and illus­trat­ed by David Macaulay
Roar­ing Brook, 2019

While Macaulay’s book is about ships, main­ly the one that brought him to the Unit­ed States, it’s also about time. The time it took peo­ple to cross the Atlantic until the inven­tion of the steam engine. The time it took William Fran­cis Gibb to design and build the SS Unit­ed States. The time it took the Macaulay fam­i­ly to come from Eng­land to New York on that ship. Filled with Macaulay’s trade­mark dia­grams and intri­cate detail, this is also a touch­ing sto­ry about a boy who want­ed to see the Empire State Build­ing — and all that it stood for — more than any­thing.

 

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Celebrating Rosh Hashanah

The Jew­ish High Hol­i­days begin with the fes­tiv­i­ties of the New Year on Rosh Hashanah and end ten days lat­er with the obser­vance of the Day of Atone­ment, Yom Kip­pur. It’s a time of reflec­tion and a renew­al of inten­tions to do bet­ter in the com­ing year. Here are a num­ber of books that will help chil­dren under­stand the tra­di­tions of the hol­i­day and expe­ri­ence the joy of the cel­e­bra­tion.

As always, if you have a book you believe should be on this list, let us know in the com­ments or send us an e‑mail. We’ll most like­ly add it, with a thanks to you.

Apple Days: a Rosh Hashanah Story  

Apple Days: a Rosh Hashanah Sto­ry
writ­ten by Alli­son Sof­fer
ill­lus­trat­ed by Bob McMa­hon
Kar-Ben Pub­lish­ing

Rosh Hashanah is Katy’s favorite hol­i­day because she loves pick­ing apples and mak­ing apple­sauce with her moth­er. But there’s a new arrival in the fam­i­ly which steers atten­tion away from the tra­di­tions. How will Katy cope?

 

Apples and Honey  

Apples and Hon­ey
writ­ten by Joan Hol­ub
illus­trat­ed by Cary Pil­lo-Lassen
Pen­guin

This lift-the-flap book shows young read­ers the mean­ing and tra­di­tions of Rosh Hashanah as chil­dren make New Year’s cards to send to fam­i­ly and friends, go to tem­ple and hear dad blow the sho­far, and, after din­ner, enjoy apples dipped in hon­ey to mark a sweet new year.

Celebrate Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur  

Cel­e­brate Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kip­pur:
with Hon­ey, Prayers, and the Sho­far

writ­ten by Deb­o­rah Heilig­man
Nation­al Geo­graph­ic Chil­dren’s Books
Hol­i­days Around the World series

A look at how these two Jew­ish High Holy Days are cel­e­brat­ed world­wide. Rosh Hashanah is a time for reflec­tion and res­o­lu­tion. On Yom Kip­pur, the Day of Atone­ment, Jews fast, pray, and ask God’s for­give­ness for their sins. Deb­o­rah Heilig­man’s live­ly first-per­son text intro­duces read­ers to the sound­ing of the sho­far, the hol­i­days’ greet­ing cards, prayers, and spe­cial foods. Rab­bi Shi­ra Stern’s infor­ma­tive note puts the High Holy Days into wider his­tor­i­cal and cul­tur­al con­text for par­ents and teach­ers.

Even Higher  

Even High­er!
A Rosh Hashanah Sto­ry by I.L. Peretz

adapt­ed by Eric A. Kim­mel
illus­trat­ed by Jill Weber
Hol­i­day House

Every year, just before Rosh Hashanah, the rab­bi of Nemirov dis­ap­pears. The vil­lagers are cer­tain their rab­bi flies up to heav­en to speak with God. Where else would such a great and holy man go just before the fate of every soul is decid­ed for the com­ing year? But a skep­ti­cal Lit­vak scoffs at the vil­lagers, claim­ing mir­a­cles can­not hap­pen. He vows to dis­cov­er the rab­bi’s secret, but what he wit­ness­es — an enor­mous act of human com­pas­sion — will make any doubter believe.

Happy New Year, Beni  

Hap­py New Year, Beni
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Jane Bre­skin Zal­ben
Macmil­lan

This Rosh Hashanah, Beni and Sara are going to Grand­ma and Grand­pa’s for the hol­i­days. Before din­ner, Sara lights the can­dles and Grand­pa says the Kid­dush. “To a sweet, good year! L’shanah Tovah!” At the tem­ple, Papa blows the sho­far and joy­ful­ly wel­comes in the new year. But cousin Max almost spoils the hol­i­day for every­one — he hogs all the sweet fruits at din­ner and puts creepy sur­pris­es under his cousins’ pil­lows. It’s only when Grand­pa takes a qui­et moment to explain the tra­di­tion of Tash­likh that Max is will­ing to start the new year off with a clean slate. Or is he?

Is It Rosh Hashanah Yet?  

Is It Rosh Hashanah Yet?
writ­ten by Chris Barash
illus­trat­ed by Alessan­dra Psacharop­u­lo
Albert Whit­man

As sum­mer ends and fall set­tles in, a fam­i­ly pre­pares to cel­e­brate the Jew­ish New Year, Rosh Hashanah. It’s time to pick apples, make cards, light the can­dles, and eat brisket to ring in the new year! The refrain “Rosh Hashanah is on its way” is repeat­able for read-alouds.

It's Shofar Time!  

It’s Sho­far Time!
writ­ten by Lat­i­fa Berry Knopf
pho­tographs by Tod Cohen
Lern­er Books

It’s Rosh Hashanah, the Jew­ish New Year. It’s time to learn new things, wear new clothes, and taste new foods. It’s time to toss crumbs into the water and say, “I’m sor­ry.” It’s time to hear the sounds of the sho­far. Rec­om­mend­ed for preschool­ers.

Little Red Rosie  

Lit­tle Red Rosie: a Rosh Hashanah Sto­ry
writ­ten by Eric A. Kim­mel
illus­trat­ed by Mon­i­ca Gutier­rez
Apples & Hon­ey Press

Wel­com­ing your guests for Rosh Hashanah requires cre­ativ­i­ty, orga­ni­za­tion, and care. In this ver­sion of The Lit­tle Red Hen, Rosie pre­pare chal­lah with a lit­tle ? help ? from her friends. 

 

Minnie's Yom Kippur Birthday  

Min­nie’s Yom Kip­pur Birth­day
writ­ten by Mar­i­lyn Singer
illus­trat­ed by Ruth Ros­ner
Harper­Collins
(con­tributed by Natal­ie A. Rosin­sky)

Min­nie’s birth­day falls on Yom Kip­pur, the most solemn of Jew­ish hol­i­days. Her father tells her that her birth­day will be dif­fer­ent, qui­et, reflec­tive. Her moth­er tells her there will also be a sur­prise. After fight­ing with her sis­ter, Min­nie lis­tens to the Rab­bi’s sto­ry of Jon­ah, who did bad things, and how the whale spit him out after he apol­o­gized. Min­nie feels bad­ly about fight­ing with her broth­er and sis­ter, and she whis­pers her apolo­gies. This book beau­ti­ful­ly includes the ele­ments of the hol­i­day and Ros­ner’s illus­tra­tions por­tray the solem­ni­ty and cel­e­bra­tion. Oh, and after the sho­far sounds, the con­gre­ga­tion brings Min­nie a birth­day cake!

Mitzi's Mitzvah  

Mitz­i’s Mitz­vah
writ­ten by Glo­ria Koster
illus­trat­ed by Hol­li Con­ger
Kar-Ben Pub­lish­ing

Mitzi is an adorable pup­py who vis­its a nurs­ing home to help the res­i­dents cel­e­brate Rosh Hashanah.

 

A Moon for Moe and Mo  

A Moon for Moe and Mo
writ­ten by Jane Bre­skin Zal­ben
illus­trat­ed by Mehrdokht Ami­ni
Charles­bridge

Moses Feld­man, a Jew­ish boy, lives at one end of Flat­bush Avenue in Brook­lyn, New York, while Mohammed Has­san, a Mus­lim boy, lives at the oth­er. One day they meet at Sahadi’s mar­ket while out shop­ping with their moth­ers and are mis­tak­en for broth­ers. A friend­ship is born, and the boys bring their fam­i­lies togeth­er to share rugelach and date cook­ies in the park as they make a wish for peace.

New Year at the Pier  

New Year at the Pier: a Rosh Hashanah Sto­ry
writ­ten by April Hal­prin Way­land
illus­trat­ed by Stephane Jorisch
Pen­guin Ran­dom House

Izzy’s favorite part of Rosh Hashanah is Tash­lich, a joy­ous cer­e­mo­ny in which peo­ple apol­o­gize for the mis­takes they made in the pre­vi­ous year and thus clean the slate as the new year begins. But there is one mis­take on Izzy’s “I’m sor­ry” list that he’s find­ing espe­cial­ly hard to say out loud.

Humor, touch­ing moments between fam­i­ly and friends, and lots of infor­ma­tion about the Jew­ish New Year are all com­bined in this love­ly pic­ture book for hol­i­day shar­ing.

Rabbi Benjamin's Buttons  

Rab­bi Ben­jam­in’s But­tons 
writ­ten by Alice McGin­ty
illus­trat­ed by Jen­nifer Black Rein­hardt
Charles­bridge

Rab­bi Ben­jam­in’s con­gre­ga­tion presents him with a new vest on Rosh Hashanah, the Jew­ish New Year. It has but­tons depict­ing the major hol­i­days cel­e­brat­ed each year. They also give him deli­cious food that he delights in eat­ing. That leads to a prob­lem: the but­tons are pop­ping off Rab­bi Ben­jam­in’s vest because he’s putting on so much weight. As he pitch­es in to help his fam­i­lies, he gets a great deal of exer­cise. Will the vest fit once again?

Sammy Spider's First Rosh Hashanah

 

Sam­my Spi­der’s First Rosh Hashanah
writ­ten by Sylvia Rouss
illus­trat­ed by Kather­ine Janus Kahn
Kar-Ben Pub­lish­ing

Young Sam­my is mis­chie­vous, fun-lov­ing, and curi­ous. What is Rosh Hashanah, the cel­e­bra­tion of the New Year? Moth­er Spi­der gives him an under­stand­ing of the rea­sons for apples and hon­ey, chal­lah bread, and greet­ing cards. The author and illus­tra­tor inte­grate the con­cept of size into the sto­ry.

Secret Shofar of Barcelona

 

Secret Sho­far of Barcelona
writ­ten by Jacque­line Dem­bar Green
illus­trat­ed by Dou­glas Chay­ka
Kar-Ben Pub­lish­ing

Sym­pho­ny con­duc­tor Don Fer­nan­do longs to hear the sounds of the sho­far. Dur­ing the Span­ish Inqui­si­tion, he has to hide his Jew­ish reli­gion and pre­tend to fol­low the teach­ings of the church. But when he is asked to per­form a con­cert cel­e­brat­ing the new world, he and his son Rafael devise a clever plan to ush­er in the Jew­ish New Year in plain sight of the Span­ish nobil­i­ty.

Talia and the Rude Vegetables

 

Talia and the Rude Veg­eta­bles
writ­ten by Lin­da Elovitz Mar­shall
illus­trat­ed by Francesca Assirelli
Kar-Ben Pub­lish­ing

Hear­ing her grand­moth­er incor­rect­ly, Talia won­ders “How can a veg­etable be ‘rude’?” Her grand­moth­er asked her to gath­er “root” veg­eta­bles for a Rosh Hashanah stew but Talia is on a mis­sion in the gar­den. She col­lects the twist­ed, ornery car­rots and parsnips and finds a good home for the rest.

Tashlich at Turtle Rock  

Tash­lich at Tur­tle Rock
writ­ten by Susan Schnur and Anna Schnur-Fish­man
illus­trat­ed by Alex Steele-Mor­ton
Kar-Ben Pub­lish­ing
(con­tributed by Natal­ie A. Rosin­sky)

Annie is excit­ed about the Tash­lich cer­e­mo­ny on the after­noon of Rosh Hashanah, when her fam­i­ly will walk to Tur­tle Rock Creek and throw crumbs into the water, as sym­bols of mis­takes made the past year. As Annie leads her fam­i­ly through the woods stop­ping at favorite rocks, bridges, and water­falls in her family’s own Tash­lich rit­u­al, they think about the good and bad things that hap­pened dur­ing the past year, and make plans for a sweet­er new year. This sto­ry focus­es on eco­log­i­cal con­nec­tions to the Tash­lich cer­e­mo­ny and encour­ages fam­i­lies to cus­tomize the rit­u­al and com­mune with nature at the New Year.

The World's Birthday

 

The World’s Birth­day
writ­ten by Bar­bara Dia­mond Goldin
illus­trat­ed by Jeanette Win­ter
Houghton Mif­flin Har­court

A lit­tle boy wants to cel­e­brate Rosh Hashanah, the world’s birth­day, in the best way he knows how: by throw­ing a birth­day par­ty! The idea is so con­ta­gious that before you know it, you may find your­self singing Hap­py Birth­day World at your own Rosh Hashanah din­ner.

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Back-to-School Favorites

This list was con­tributed by Deb Andries and Mau­r­na Rome, friends, edu­ca­tors, and col­leagues!

Favorites from Deb Andries:

Alma and How She Got her Name by Jua­na Mar­tinez-Neal

Dream­ers by Yuyi Morales

A Qui­et Place by Doug Wood and Dan Andreasen

The Day You Begin by Jacque­line Wood­son and Rafael López

Tru­man by Jean Rei­di and Lucy Ruth Cum­mins

Drum Dream Girl by Mar­gari­ta Engle and Rafael López

How to Read a Book by Kwame Alexan­der and Melis­sa Sweet

Why by Lau­ra Vac­caro Seeger

Each Kind­ness by Jacque­line Wood­son and E.B. Lewis

A Piece of Home by Jeri Watts and Hye­won Yum

From Mau­r­na Rome:

Favorite back to school books to encour­age pos­i­tiv­i­ty and com­mu­ni­ty in my class­room:

Courage: Thun­der Rose by Jer­dine Nolen and Kadir Nel­son

Empa­thy: I Am Human, A Book of Empa­thy by Susan Verde and Peter H. Reynolds

Patience: Wait­ing for the Bib­liobur­ro by Mon­i­ca Brown and John Par­ra

Cre­ativ­i­ty: The Secret King­dom: Nek Chand, a Chang­ing India, and a Hid­den World of Art by Barb Rosen­stock and Claire A. Nivola

Humor: Be Qui­et by Ryan T. Hig­gins

Kind­ness: I Walk with Vanes­sa by Karas­coët

Curios­i­ty: What Do You Do with an Idea? by Kobi Yama­da and Mae Besom

Growth Mind­set: Drum Dream Girl by Mar­gari­ta Engle and Rafael López 

Per­se­ver­ance: Lui­gi and the Bare­foot Races by Dan Paley and Aaron Boyd

Accep­tance: I Am Enough by Grace Byers and Ketu­rah A. Bobo

[Andries_Deb_Bio]

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Libraries and Librarians

We’re post­ing this when it’s Nation­al Library Week, but we believe every week should be Library Week. If you love pub­lic, school, and spe­cial libraries as much as we do, add these books to your read­ing list and share them with your favorite read­ers.

As always, if you have a book you believe should be on this list, let us know in the com­ments or send us an e‑mail. We’ll most like­ly add it, with a thanks to you.

Bats in the Library  

Bats in the Library
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Bri­an Lies
Houghton Mif­flin Har­court, 2008

Join the free-for-all fun at the pub­lic library with these book-lov­ing bats! Shape shad­ows on walls, frol­ic in the water foun­tain, and roam the book-filled halls until it’s time for every­one, young and old, to set­tle down into the enchant­ment of sto­ry time. Bri­an Lies’ joy­ful crit­ters and their noc­tur­nal cel­e­bra­tion cast library vis­its in a new light.

 

Book Scavenger  

Book Scav­enger
writ­ten by Jen­nifer Cham­b­liss Bert­man
Hen­ry Holt, 2015

The first of a three-book series joins Emi­ly and James as they try to crack Gar­ri­son Griswold’s online game to find books hid­den in cities all over the coun­try. They work hard to solve puz­zles and sort our clues. Gris­wold has been attacked and lies in a coma in the hos­pi­tal. Will they com­plete the game before and find the secret before Griswold’s assailant comes after them?

 

Dewey the Library Cat  

Dewey the Library Cat: a True Sto­ry
writ­ten by Vic­ki Myron and Bret Wit­ter
Lit­tle, Brown, 2011

When a cat is aban­doned in a library book drop in the mid­dle of win­ter, he is adopt­ed by Spencer, Iowa’s pub­lic library, quick­ly becom­ing a favorite with library patrons. Dewey Read­more Books, a real cat and a true sto­ry, is the cat­a­lyst for a love­ly sto­ry about hope and friend­ship.

 

Down Cut Shin Creek  

Down Cut Shin Creek:
The Pack Horse Librar­i­ans of Ken­tucky

writ­ten by Kathi Appelt and Jeanne Can­nel­la Schmitzer
Harper­Collins, 2001

From 1935 to 1943, the WPA paid women to ride into the Appalachi­an hills of Ken­tucky to deliv­er books, mag­a­zines, pam­phlets, and oth­er read­ing mate­ri­als to peo­ple who lived in hard-to-reach loca­tions. The Pack Horse Library Project was inno­v­a­tive in help­ing to raise peo­ple up dur­ing the Great Depres­sion. The pho­tos in this book are evoca­tive of the era. Very inspir­ing.

 

Dreamers  

Dream­ers
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Yuyi Morales
Neal Porter Books, 2018
(con­tributed by Dr. Hei­di Ham­mond)

Shar­ing her own sto­ry about immi­grat­ing to this coun­try from Mex­i­co with her young son, we learn that they did not have an easy time of it. By vis­it­ing the pub­lic library, they learned the lan­guage of their new home. It is a book about becom­ing a cre­ative artist despite heart-break­ing chal­lenges. It is a beau­ti­ful book, illus­trat­ed with Ms. Morales’ charis­mat­ic vision. “We are two languages./ We are lucha./ We are resilience./ We are hope.”

 

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's Library  

Escape from Mr. Lemon­cel­lo’s Library
writ­ten by Chris Graben­stein
Ran­dom House, 2013

Kyle Kee­ley, who would rather play board games and video games than do any­thing else, is invit­ed to a sleep­over at his hometown’s brand new library, cre­at­ed by Lui­gi Lemon­cel­lo, the game inven­tor Kyle admires most. There are games galore and lots of fun but when morn­ing rolls around, the doors mys­te­ri­ous­ly stay locked. Kyle and the oth­er game-play­ers have to solve the games and puz­zles or they won’t get out. Lots of fun.

The Haunted Library

 

The Haunt­ed Library
writ­ten by Dori Hillestad But­ler, illus­trat­ed by Aurore Damant
Gros­set & Dun­lap, 2014 (a series)

There’s a ghost haunt­ing the library. Kaz is a boy ghost who is forced to move when the build­ing he and his fam­i­ly haunt is torn down. He meets a real girl, Claire, who can see ghosts. She lives above the library. Will the two of them be able to solve the mys­tery to fig­ure out who the library’s ghost is and what they’re doing there?

The Imaginary  

The Imag­i­nary
by A.F. Har­rold
illus­trat­ed by Emi­ly Gravett
Blooms­bury, 2015

Aman­da Shuf­fle­up has an imag­i­nary friend, Rudger. Nobody else can see Rudger … until the evil Mr. Bunting knocks on the door. He wants to eat Rudger because that’s how he con­tin­ues to live. Aman­da dis­ap­pears and Rudger is alone. He must find her and he has to escape from Bunting. Soon, he finds him­self in a library filled with imag­in­ery friends who are try­ing not to fade out of exis­tence … or be eat­en. It’s a delight­ful­ly spooky and off­beat mid­dle grade nov­el.

 

Librarian of Basra  

Librar­i­an of Bas­ra: A True Sto­ry from Iraq
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Jean­nette Win­ter
HMH Books for Young Read­ers, 2005
(con­tributed by Ani­ta Dualeh)

Alia Muham­mad Bak­er is a librar­i­an in Bas­ra, Iraq. For many years, her library has been a meet­ing place for those who love books. Until war comes to Bas­ra. Alia fears that the library, along with thir­ty thou­sand books in its col­lec­tion, will be destroyed for­ev­er.

In a war-strick­en coun­try where civil­ians, espe­cial­ly women, have lit­tle pow­er, this true sto­ry about a librar­i­an’s strug­gle to save her com­mu­ni­ty’s price­less col­lec­tion of books reminds us all how, through­out the world, the love of lit­er­a­ture and the respect for knowl­edge know no bound­aries

 

Libraries of Minnesota  

Libraries of Min­neso­ta
text by Will Weaver, Pete Haut­man, Nan­cy Carl­son, Mar­sha Wil­son Chall, David LaRochelle, and Kao Kalia Yang
pho­tog­ra­phy by Doug Ohman
Min­neso­ta His­tor­i­cal Soci­ety Press, 2011

Does your state have a book hon­or­ing its many libraries? If it doesn’t, you’re miss­ing a treat. This book shares the sto­ries of a num­ber of children’s and YA book authors who fond­ly remem­ber their expe­ri­ences at the library, accom­pa­nied by a mas­ter­ful photographer’s images from those and many oth­er libraries.

 

The Library  

The Library
by Sarah Stew­art
illus­trat­ed by David Small
Far­rar, Staus, Giroux, 1995
(con­tributed by Beth Raff)

Eliz­a­beth Brown loves to read more than she likes to do any­thing else. She col­lects books and soon they are mak­ing it hard to open the door to her house. So many books! What to do? Why, start a lend­ing library of course! A charm­ing book with beau­ti­ful illus­tra­tions.

 

Library Lil  

Library Lil
by Susanne Williams
illus­trat­ed by Steven Kel­logg
Pen­guin, 2001

From the day she was born, Lil had a book in her hand…so it’s no sur­prise when she grows up to become a librar­i­an her­self. She even man­ages to turn the peo­ple of Chester­ville — who are couch pota­toes — into read­ers. But then Bust-’em-up Bill roars into town with his motor­cy­cle gang. Just men­tion read­ing to him and you’re toast. Has Lil final­ly met her match? This orig­i­nal tall tale by a real-life librar­i­an, com­bined with Steven Kel­log­g’s trade­mark humor, is great fun.

 

Library Lion  

Library Lion 
by Michelle Knud­sen
illus­trat­ed by Kevin Hawkes
Can­dlewick Press, 2006

Miss Mer­ri­weath­er, the head librar­i­an, is very par­tic­u­lar about rules in the library. No run­ning allowed. And you must be qui­et. But when a lion comes to the library one day, no one is sure what to do. There aren’t any rules about lions in the library. This is an endear­ing book and a good read-aloud.

 

Lola at the Library

 

Lola at the Library
writ­ten by Anna McQuinn
illus­trat­ed by Ros­alind Beard­shaw
Charles­bridge, 2006

A good sto­ry for intro­duc­ing young read­ers to the library. She and her mom­my go to the library every Tues­day, where Lola has dis­cov­ered friends. They share books, lis­ten to the librar­i­an tell them sto­ries, and engage in play. They don’t even have to be qui­et! No won­der Lola loves the library.

Lost in the Library: a Story of Patience and Fortitude

 

Lost in the Library: A Sto­ry of Patience and For­ti­tude
writ­ten by Josh Funk
illus­trat­ed by Ste­vie Lewis
Hen­ry Holt, 2018

Did you know that the lions in front of the New York Pub­lic Library are named Patience and For­ti­tude? Well, now you know. When Patience goes miss­ing, For­ti­tude does his best to find her. Where should he look? He begins at the Library …

The Man Who Loved Libraries

 

The Man Who Loved Libraries:
The Sto­ry of Andrew Carnegie

writ­ten by Andrew Larsen
illus­trat­ed by Kat­ty Mau­rey
OwlKids, 2017
(con­tributed by Beth Raff)

Andrew Carnegie arrived in Amer­i­ca in the 1840s, hav­ing emi­grat­ed from Scot­land. His work­ing class fam­i­ly raised him to believe in hard work and deter­mi­na­tion. He worked hard and invest­ed in telegraphs and rail­roads, even­tu­al­ly becom­ing the rich­est man in the world. He believed in phil­an­thropy, donat­ing more than 2,000 libraries around the world. He changed the land­scape of pub­lic libraries and how peo­ple think about books and read­ing.

Miss Moore Thought Otherwise

 

Miss Moore Thought Oth­er­wise: How Anne Car­roll Moore Cre­at­ed Libraries for Chil­dren
writ­ten by Jan Pin­bor­ough
illus­trat­ed by Deb­by Atwell
Houghton Mif­flin Har­court, 2013

There was a time when Amer­i­can chil­dren couldn’t bor­row library books. Many thought it was­n’t impor­tant for chil­dren to read. Luck­i­ly Miss Anne Car­roll Moore thought oth­er­wise! This is the true sto­ry of how Miss Moore cre­at­ed the first children’s room at the New York Pub­lic Library, a bright, warm room filled with art­work, win­dow seats, and most impor­tant of all, bor­row­ing priv­i­leges for the world’s best children’s books in many dif­fer­ent lan­guages.

No. T.Rex in the Library

 

No T.Rex in the Library
writ­ten by Toni Buzzeo
illus­trat­ed by Sachiko Yoshikawa
Mar­garet K. McElder­ry Books, 2010

It’s a qui­et morn­ing in the library until a lit­tle girl roars out of con­trol! Tess resigns her­self to a time-out, but finds that she must be the one who has to main­tain order when T.Rex leaps from the pages of a book into real life. Will the library ever be the same?

Pete the Cat Checks Out the Library

 

Pete the Cat Checks Out the Library
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by James Dean
Harper­Collins, 2018

When Pete the Cat vis­its the library for the first time, he takes a tour and reads some of the cool sto­ries. With­out even leav­ing the library, Pete goes on groovy adven­tures. All Pete needs is a lit­tle imag­i­na­tion — and of course, his library card!

Planting Stories

 

Plant­i­ng Sto­ries:
The Life of Librar­i­an and Sto­ry­teller Pura Bel­pré

writ­ten by Ani­ka Aldamuy Denise
illus­trat­ed by Pao­la Esco­bar
Harper­Collins, 2019

When she came to Amer­i­ca in 1921, Pura Bel­pré car­ried the cuen­tos folk­lóri­cos of her Puer­to Rican home­land. Find­ing a new home at the New York Pub­lic Library as a bilin­gual assis­tant, she turned her pop­u­lar retellings into libros and spread sto­ry seeds across the land. Today, these seeds have grown into a lush land­scape as gen­er­a­tions of chil­dren and sto­ry­tellers con­tin­ue to share her tales and cel­e­brate Pura’s lega­cy.

Properly Unhaunted Place

 

Prop­er­ly Unhaunt­ed Place
writ­ten by William Alexan­der
Mar­garet K. McElder­ry Books, 2017

Ingot is the only ghost-free town in the world. When Rosa moves to Ingot with her moth­er, she can’t fig­ure out why they’re there. Rosa’s moth­er is a ghost-appease­ment librar­i­an. Her job is to keep ghosts out of the library, but there are none. Or is that true? Rosa joins forces with Jasper, long-time Ingot res­i­dent, to solve the mys­tery and keep the angry spir­its from attack­ing the town and the library. It’s a fast-paced and humor­ous tale. A page-turn­er for mid­dle grade read­ers.

A sec­ond book, A Fes­ti­val of Ghosts, con­tin­ues the sto­ry.

Ron's Big Mission

 

Ron’s Big Mis­sion
writ­ten by Rose Blue and Corinne J. Naden
illus­trat­ed by Don Tate
Dut­ton, 2009
(con­tributed by Dr. Hei­di Ham­mond)

Nine-year-old Ron loves going to the Lake City Pub­lic Library to look through all the books on air­planes and flight. Today, Ron is ready to take out books by him­self. But in the seg­re­gat­ed world of South Car­oli­na in the 1950s, Ron’s obtain­ing his own library card is not just a small rite of pas­sage — it is a young man’s first coura­geous mis­sion. Here is an inspir­ing sto­ry, based on Ron McNair’s life, of how a lit­tle boy, future sci­en­tist, and Chal­lenger astro­naut deseg­re­gat­ed his library through peace­ful resis­tance.

Schomburg

 

Schom­burg: The Man Who Built a Library
writ­ten by Car­ole Boston Weath­er­ford
illus­trat­ed by Eric Velasquez
Can­dlewick Press, 2017

Amid the schol­ars, poets, authors, and artists of the Harlem Renais­sance stood an Afro – Puer­to Rican named Arturo Schom­burg. This law clerk’s life’s pas­sion was to col­lect books, let­ters, music, and art from Africa and the African dias­po­ra and bring to light the achieve­ments of peo­ple of African descent through the ages. When Schomburg’s col­lec­tion became so big it began to over­flow his house, he turned to the New York Pub­lic Library, where he cre­at­ed and curat­ed a col­lec­tion that was the cor­ner­stone of a new Negro Divi­sion. A cen­tu­ry lat­er, his ground­break­ing col­lec­tion, known as the Schom­burg Cen­ter for Research in Black Cul­ture, has become a bea­con to schol­ars all over the world.

That Book Woman

 

That Book Woman
writ­ten by Heather Hen­son
illus­trat­ed by David Small
Atheneum, 2008
(con­tributed by Ani­ta Dualeh)

Cal does­n’t like to read so he has a hard time under­stand­ing why that book woman rides up to his house over some of the tough­est ter­rain in Appalachia just to bring his sis­ter more to read. He admires the per­sis­tence of this Pack Horse Librar­i­an, though, and read­ers of this book will be awed by how this WPA lit­er­a­cy projects turned so many peo­ple into life­long read­ers.

Tomas and the Library Lady

 

Tomás and the Library Lady
writ­ten by Pat Mora
illus­trat­ed by Raul Colón
Knopf, 19972

Based on the true sto­ry of the Mex­i­can-Amer­i­can author and edu­ca­tor Tomás Rivera, a child of migrant work­ers who went on to become the first minor­i­ty Chan­cel­lor in the Uni­ver­si­ty of Cal­i­for­nia sys­tem, this inspi­ra­tional sto­ry sug­gests what libraries — and edu­ca­tion — can make pos­si­ble.

When the Library Lights Go Out

 

When the Library Lights Go Out
writ­ten by Megan McDon­ald
illus­trat­ed by Kater­ine Tillot­son
Atheneum, 20015

When the library clos­es at night, have you imag­ined what goes on inside? Three sto­ry-hour pup­pets believe the “closed” sign means “open for adven­ture.” At first there are only Rab­bit and Lion. Her­mit Crab is miss­ing. Where can she be in the library dark­ness? Find out for your­self when — mag­i­cal­ly — only pup­pets are mov­ing about in the library.

Who Stole the Wizard of Oz?

 

Who Stole the Wiz­ard of Oz?
writ­ten by Avi
Knopf, 1981

When a rare edi­tion of The Wiz­ard of Oz is miss­ing from the local library, Becky is accused of steal­ing it. She and her twin broth­er Toby set out to catch the real thief and prove her inno­cence. Clues clev­er­ly hid­den in four oth­er books lead to a hid­den trea­sure — and a grip­ping adven­ture. A good read-aloud for ear­ly grades.

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The Animals in The Stuff of Stars

The Stuff of StarsWhen I first read The Stuff of Stars by Mar­i­on Dane Bauer and Ekua Holmes, I was cap­ti­vat­ed by the beau­ty of the book and its lyri­cal thoughts about the earth and our envi­ron­ment. Ms. Holmes’ illus­tra­tions invite us to look clos­er, to dis­cern the crea­tures she’s so art­ful­ly includ­ed. Ms. Bauer’s text includes a list of ani­mals that roam the earth, bring­ing to mind all of the sto­ries and facts about these spe­cif­ic ani­mals, birds, insects, and rep­tiles.

We thought it would be help­ful to pull togeth­er a Quirky Book List that you could use for dis­cus­sions in your class­room, research units, book dis­plays on The Stuff of Stars theme, or inde­pen­dent read­ing. Be sure to refer to Bookol­o­gy’s Book­storm for The Stuff of Stars for more resources that com­ple­ment this book.

BEETLES
Bonkers about Beetles  

Bonkers about Bee­tles
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Owen Davies
Fly­ing Eye Books, 2018

Fun and fas­ci­nat­ing infor­ma­tion about the tough­est bugs in the world. The illus­tra­tions are incred­i­ble but the facts will astound young read­ers.

 

Masterpiece  

Mas­ter­piece
writ­ten by Elise Broach
illus­trat­ed by Kel­ly Mur­phy
Hen­ry Holt, 2008

Mar­vin, the bee­tle, lives under the kitchen sink in the Pom­pa­days’ apart­ment. James Pom­pa­day is an eleven-year-old boy who lives in the same apart­ment. When James receives a pen-and-ink set for his birth­day, Mar­vin sur­pris­es him with an intri­cate draw­ing. Soon, these two friends are drawn into a staged heist of an Albrecht Dür­er draw­ing at the Met­ro­pol­i­tan Muse­um of Art.

 

One Beetle Too Many  

One Bee­tle Too Many:
The Extra­or­di­nary Adven­tures of Charles Dar­win
writ­ten by Kathryn Lasky
illus­trat­ed by Matthew True­man
Can­dlewick Press, 2009

A child­hood of col­lect­ing spec­i­mens, espe­cial­ly bee­tles, Charles Dar­win was a nat­u­ral­ist to his very toes, hap­pi­est when he was sail­ing The Bea­gle to South Amer­i­ca to observe the flo­ra and fau­na. Lasky writes the sto­ry of Darwin’s life in a way that reveals the com­plex man who chal­lenged the world’s think­ing.

BLUEBIRDS

Bluebird

 

Blue­bird
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Lind­sey Yankey
Sim­ply Read Books, 2014

Lit­tle Blue­bird awak­ens one morn­ing to find the wind miss­ing. She and wind always fly togeth­er. Deter­mined to find the way, Blue­bird sets off on a clever, well-illus­trat­ed, heart­warm­ing jour­ney.

 

Bluebird  

Blue­bird
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Bob Staake
Schwartz & Wade, 2013

In this emo­tion­al pic­ture book, read­ers will be cap­ti­vat­ed as they fol­low the jour­ney of a blue­bird as he devel­ops a friend­ship with a young boy and ulti­mate­ly risks his life to save the boy from harm.

 

Captivating Bluebirds  

Cap­ti­vat­ing Blue­birds:
Excep­tion­al Images and Obser­va­tions
writ­ten and pho­tographed by Stan Tekiela
Adven­ture Pub­li­ca­tions, 2008

Although not strict­ly a children’s book, Tekiela’s out­stand­ing pho­tographs will keep children’s atten­tion as you share some of the intrigu­ing facts on each page.

 

What Bluebirds Do

 

What Blue­birds Do
writ­ten by Pamela Kir­by
Boyds Mills Press, 2009

After a male and female blue­bird select a place to nest, they raise a young fam­i­ly of hatch­lings, feed­ing them and encour­ag­ing them to fly off on their own. Excel­lent pho­tographs illus­trate this book.

BUTTERFLIES

Caterpillar to Butterfly

 

Cater­pil­lar to But­ter­fly
writ­ten by Lau­ra Marsh
Nation­al Geo­graph­ic Kids, 2012

This ear­ly read­er gives kids an close-up look, through stel­lar pho­tographs, at how a cater­pil­lar becomes a but­ter­fly. The book includes infor­ma­tion about the dif­fer­ent types of but­ter­flies and poi­so­nous cater­pil­lars.

How to Hide a Butterfly

 

How to Hide a But­ter­fly & Oth­er Insects
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Ruth Heller
Gros­set & Dun­lap, 1992

Each page invites the read­er to hunt for the but­ter­fly or bee or inch­worm, all the while nar­rat­ed by Heller’s dis­tinc­tive poet­ic text.

A Place for Butterflies

 

A Place for But­ter­flies
writ­ten by Melis­sa Stew­art
illus­trat­ed by Hig­gins Bond
Peachtree Press, 2006

By fram­ing but­ter­flies as a vital­ly inter­con­nect­ed part of our world, this book teach­es about behav­ior and habi­tat, while encour­ag­ing efforts to pre­serve forests and mead­ows, cut­ting down on pes­ti­cides.

CRICKETS

Cricket in Times Square

 

CLASSIC
A Crick­et in Times Square
writ­ten by George Selden
illus­trat­ed by Garth Williams
Far­rar, Straus & Giroux, 1960

When Chester Crick­et hops into a pic­nic bas­ket, lured by the smell of liv­er­wurst, this coun­try crick­et is trans­port­ed to Times Square. There, he’s giv­en a com­fy home by Mario Belli­ni, and becomes friends with Tuck­er Mouse and Har­ry Cat. And yet, Chester’s coun­try home calls to him. A favorite of young read­ers for more than 50 years!

Oscar and the Cricket

 

Oscar and the Crick­et
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Geoff War­ing
Can­dlewick Press, 2009

A begin­ning sci­ence book that teach­es about mov­ing and rolling. One day Oscar sees a ball in the grass. “Try push­ing it!” says Crick­et. Oscar learns that the ball rolls slow­ly in grass and faster on a path, until it bounces off a tree and changes direc­tion. Some things need a push to move, and oth­ers use their mus­cles to move them­selves — and to move plen­ty of oth­er things, too.

Quick as a Cricket

 

Quick as a Crick­et
writ­ten by Audrey Wood
illus­trat­ed by Don Wood
Child’s Play Library, 1982.

I’m as quick as a crick­et, I’m as slow as a snail. I’m as small as an ant, I’m as large as a whale.” The young child plays with imag­i­na­tion and words, illus­trat­ed with fun and ram­bunc­tious inter­pre­ta­tion.

FROGS

Frog and Toad Are Friends

 

CLASSIC
Frog and Toad Are Friends
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Arnold Lobel
Harper­Collins, 1970.

The beloved tale of two friends who are always there for each oth­er, whether it’s find­ing a lost but­ton or going swim­ming or writ­ing let­ters.

The Frog Book

 

The Frog Book
writ­ten by Robin Page
illus­trat­ed by Steve Jenk­ins
HMH Books for Young Read­ers, 2019

With more than 5,000 dif­fer­ent frog species on the plan­et, in every col­or of the rain­bow and a vast num­ber of vivid pat­terns, no crea­tures are more fas­ci­nat­ing to learn about or look at. Jenk­ins and Page present a stun­ning array of these intrigu­ing amphib­ians and the many amaz­ing adap­ta­tions they have made to sur­vive. An excel­lent non­fic­tion pic­ture book.

It's Mine!

 

It’s Mine!
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Leo Leon­ni
Scholas­tic, 1986

Three frogs con­stant­ly fight and bick­er over who gets to eat the lat­est hap­less insect. But a toad and a storm help them real­ize that there are mer­its to shar­ing.

GIRAFFES

Giraffes

 

Giraffes
writ­ten by Lin­da Marsh
Nation­al Geo­graph­ic Read­ers, 2016

A true book, with inter­est­ing facts and teach­ing points for begin­ning read­ers. Giraffes are fas­ci­nat­ing crea­tures. The text and pho­tos in this book are engag­ing and mem­o­rable.

Giraffes Can't Dance

 

Giraffes Can’t Dance
writ­ten by Giles Andreae
illus­trat­ed by Guy Park­er-Rees
Orchard Books, 2001

Ger­ald the giraffe is excit­ed to go to the dance but the oth­er ani­mals tell him he can’t dance because he has knob­by knees and skin­ny legs and he’ll look sil­ly. Ger­ald slinks away, unhap­py, until a kind voice tells him to dance to a dif­fer­ent song. Soon Ger­ald is danc­ing so beau­ti­ful­ly that the oth­er ani­mals gath­er to watch and admire.

Stay Close to Mama

 

Stay Close to Mama
writ­ten by Toni Buzzeo
illus­trat­ed by Mike Wohnout­ka
Dis­ney / Hype­r­i­on, 2012

Twiga is curi­ous and wants to explore, but Mama knows about the dan­gers of the savan­nah and wants to pro­tect lit­tle Twiga. An excel­lent read-aloud with engag­ing illus­tra­tions.

HAWKS

Hawk Rising

 

Hawk Ris­ing
writ­ten by Maria Gian­fer­rari
illus­trat­ed by Bri­an Flo­ca
Roar­ing Brook Press, 2018

A father red-tailed hawk hunts prey for his fam­i­ly in a sub­ur­ban neigh­bor­hood in this thrilling, fierce non­fic­tion pic­ture book. Infor­ma­tive book writ­ten in sen­so­ry, poet­ic, per­cep­tive text with Bri­an Floca’s stun­ning illus­tra­tions.

Tale of Pale Male

 

Tale of Pale Male: a True Sto­ry
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Jeanette Win­ter
Har­court, 2007

When a red-tailed hawk makes its nest on top of a New York City apart­ment build­ing, the res­i­dents remove the nest, pro­test­ers raise their voic­es, and even­tu­al­ly bird­ers rejoice.

Birds of Prey

 

Birds of Prey: Hawks, Eagles, Fal­cons,
and Vul­tures of North Amer­i­ca
writ­ten by Pete Dunne, with Kevin T. Karl­son
HMH Books for Young Read­ers, 2017

A book of nature writ­ing that dou­bles as a field guide, this is a well-researched and ‑writ­ten book with accom­pa­ny­ing pho­tos.

HIPPOPOTAMUSES

Mama for Owen

 

A Mama for Owen
writ­ten by Mar­i­on Dane Bauer
illus­trat­ed by John But­ler
Simon & Schus­ter, 2007

When an African baby hip­po is sep­a­rat­ed from its moth­er dur­ing the Indi­an Ocean Tsuna­mi of 2004, it bonds with a giant tor­toise. This is a gen­tle per­spec­tive on the true sto­ry.

I've Lost My Hiippopotamus

 

I’ve Lost My Hip­popota­mus
poems by Jack Pre­lut­sky
illus­trat­ed by Jack­ie Urbanovic
Green­wil­low, 2012

Short, rhyth­mic poems about ani­mals that are ide­al for ear­ly read­ers.

How to Clean a Hippopotamus

 

How to Clean a Hip­popota­mus:
A Look at Unusu­al Ani­mal Part­ner­ships
writ­ten by Robin Page
illus­trat­ed by Steve Jenk­ins
HMH Books for Younger Read­ers, 2010

A non­fic­tion book about ani­mal sym­bio­sis, fea­tur­ing the hip­popota­mus as well as oth­er ani­mals.

Saving Fiona

 

Sav­ing Fiona:
The Sto­ry of the World’s Most Famous Baby Hip­po
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Thane May­nard
HMH Books for Young Read­ers, 2018

The sto­ry of the first pre­ma­ture baby hip­po born in cap­tiv­i­ty, raised at the Cincin­nati Zoo & Botan­i­cal Gar­den.

George and Martha

 

CLASSIC
George and Martha
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by James Mar­shall
HMH Books for Young Read­ers, 1972

Legions of fans love these sto­ries about two hip­pos who rev­el in being friends.

HORSES

The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses

 

The Girl Who Loved Wild Hors­es
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Paul Gob­le
Atheneum, 2001

Though she is fond of her peo­ple, a girl prefers to live among the wild hors­es where she is tru­ly hap­py and free.

Leroy Ninker Saddles Up

 

Leroy Ninker Sad­dles Up
writ­ten by Kate DiCamil­lo
illus­trat­ed by Chris Van Dusen
Can­dlewick Press, 2014

Leroy Ninker has all the trap­pings of a cow­boy, but he doesn’t have a horse. Then he meets May­belline, a horse who loves spaghet­ti and hav­ing sweet noth­ings whis­pered in her ear. Will their rela­tion­ship mean an end to Leroy’s lone­li­ness?

Misty of Chincoteague

 

CLASSIC
Misty of Chin­coteague
writ­ten by Mar­garet Hen­ry
illus­trat­ed by Wes­ley Den­nis
Rand McNal­ly, 1947

On the island of Chin­coteague off the coasts of Vir­ginia and Mary­land lives a cen­turies-old band of wild ponies. Among them is the most mys­te­ri­ous of all, Phan­tom, a rarely seen mare that eludes all efforts to cap­ture her — that is, until a young boy and girl lay eyes on her and deter­mine that they can’t live with­out her.

Rosie's Magic Horse

 

Rosie’s Mag­ic Horse
writ­ten by Rus­sell Hoban
illus­trat­ed by Quentin Blake
Can­dlewick Press, 2013

Rosie puts a dis­card ice-pop stick into a box, but the stick wants to be some­thing! When Rosie dreams of a horse named Stick­eri­no, the ice-pop stick trans­forms, gal­lop­ing out of the box. “Where to?” he asks. “Any­where with trea­sure!”

JELLYFISH

I Am Jellyfish

 

I Am Jel­ly­fish
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Ruth Paul
Pen­guin, 2018

Jel­ly­fish is chased into the ocean depths by Shark. Shark is attached by Squid. Who will save Shark? Jel­ly­fish!

Peanut Butter and Jellyfish

 

Peanut But­ter and Jel­ly­fish
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Jar­rett J. Krosocz­ka
Knopf, 2014

Peanut But­ter, a sea­horse, and Jel­ly­fish are best friends. Crab­by is NOT their best friend. But when Crab­by gets into trou­ble, will Peanut But­ter and Jel­ly­fish help? Of course they will.

The Thing about Jellyfish

 

The Thing About Jel­ly­fish
writ­ten by Ali Ben­jamin
Lit­tle, Brown, 2015

For a mid­dle grade read­er: Suzi con­vinces her­self that her friend Fran­ny drowned because she was stung by a rare jel­ly­fish. Suzi explores her the­o­ry and comes to real­ize many truths that make it pos­si­ble for her to grow past her grief and remorse.

LARKS

Ostrich and Lark

 

Ostrich and Lark
writ­ten by Mar­i­lyn Nel­son
illus­trat­ed by the San artists of Botswana
Boyds Mills Press, 2012

This pic­ture book about an unlike­ly friend­ship is the result of col­lab­o­ra­tion between the award-win­ning poet Mar­i­lyn Nel­son and the San artists of Botswana. The sto­ry, which cap­tures the feel of a tra­di­tion­al African folk­tale, is brought to life with vibrant illus­tra­tions inspired by the ancient rock paint­ings of the San people’s ances­tors.

LIONS

Deadliest Animals

 

Dead­liest Ani­mals
writ­ten by Melis­sa Stew­art
Nation­al Geo­graph­ic Children’s Books, 2011

Fas­ci­nat­ing facts about the most threat­en­ing ani­mals in the world, includ­ing lions, writ­ten on an ear­ly read­er lev­el.

Eli

 

Eli
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Bill Peet
HMH Books for Young Read­ers, 1978

A decrepit lion despis­es a vul­ture, but he soon learns about friend­ship from his pesky vis­i­tor.

Library Lion

 

Library Lion
writ­ten by Michelle Knud­sen
illus­trat­ed by Kevin Hawkes
Can­dlewick Press, 2006

Miss Mer­ri­weath­er is a librar­i­an with a lot of rules for her library. When a lion appears one day, there isn’t a rule to cov­er it. What will they do? The lion res­cues the library, which finds a place for him.

Lion and the Mouse

 

The Lion and the Mouse
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Jer­ry Pinkney
Lit­tle, Brown Books, 2009

A book about a devel­op­ing friend­ship between an unlike­ly pair, with ele­ments of fam­i­ly bonds woven into the famil­iar fable. African ani­mals are beau­ti­ful­ly depict­ed in the Calde­cott-win­ning illus­tra­tions for this book.

SHARKS

Great White Shark Adventure

 

Great White Shark Adven­ture
writ­ten by James O. Fraioli and Fabi­en Cousteau
illus­trat­ed by Joe St. Pierre
Mar­garet K. McElder­ry Books, 2019

Graph­ic nov­el. Junior explor­ers Bel­la and Mar­cus join famed explor­er Fabi­en Cousteau and his research team as they embark on an ocean jour­ney off the coast of South Africa, where the world’s largest con­cen­tra­tions of great white sharks are found. Their mis­sion is to inves­ti­gate a sight­ing of a mas­sive white shark and tag it so they can track and pro­tect it. 

If Sharks DIsappeared

 

If Sharks Dis­ap­peared
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Lily Williams
Roar­ing Brook Press, 2017

Even though sharks can be scary, we need them to keep the oceans healthy. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, due to over­fish­ing, many shark species are in dan­ger of extinc­tion, and that can cause big prob­lems in the oceans and even on land.

Shark vs Train

 

Shark vs Train
writ­ten by Chris Bar­ton
illus­trat­ed by Tom Licht­en­held
Lit­tle, Brown, 2010

Smack talk­ing, Shark and Train are pit­ted against each oth­er in this wild and crazy book about what would help them gain suprema­cy in a vari­ety of sit­u­a­tions. Fun!

SNAILS

The Biggest House in the World

 

CLASSIC
The Biggest House in the World
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Leo Lion­ni
Knopf, 1968

A young snail is deter­mined to have the biggest shell in the world until his father tells him a gen­tle fable about the respon­si­bil­i­ty and weight of car­ry­ing around that type of shell.

The End of the Beginning

 

The End of the Begin­ning:
Being the Adven­tures of a Small Snail
(and an Even Small­er Ant)
writ­ten by Avi
illus­trat­ed by Tri­cia Tusa
Har­court, 2004

Avon the snail sets out on an adven­ture because that’s what every­one does. They encounter a drag­on in dis­guise, the begin­ning of the sky, and a mag­ic cas­tle. Along the way, they dis­cov­er friend­ship. It’s a great read-aloud for kinder­garten and up.

The Snail and the Whale

 

The Snail and the Whale
writ­ten by Julia Don­ald­son
illus­trat­ed by Axel Schef­fler
Dial Books, 2004

A tiny snail and a hump­back whale set out to trav­el the world, explor­ing the oceans, under­wa­ter caves, and the skies. When the whale is strand­ed on the beach, will the snail be able to save him?

SPIDERS

Charlotte's Web

 

CLASSIC
Charlotte’s Web
writ­ten by E.B. White
illus­trat­ed by Garth Williams
Harp­er & Bros, 1952

Some Pig. Hum­ble. Radi­ant.These are the words in Char­lot­te’s web, high up in Zuck­er­man’s barn. Char­lot­te’s spi­der­web tells of her feel­ings for a lit­tle pig named Wilbur, who sim­ply wants a friend. They also express the love of a girl named Fern, who saved Wilbur’s life when he was born the runt of his lit­ter.

Spiders

 

Spi­ders
writ­ten by Lau­ra Marsh
Nation­al Geo­graph­ic Children’s Books, 2011

Spi­ders are every­where. And there are so many kinds of spi­ders! Some red, some blue, yel­low, and more … all fas­ci­nat­ing. Amaz­ing pho­tog­ra­phy and easy-to-under­stand text makes Spi­ders a hit.

Very Busy Spider

 

CLASSIC
Very Busy Spi­der
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Eric Car­le
Philomel, 1985

Ear­ly one morn­ing a lit­tle spi­der spins her web on a fence post. One by one, the ani­mals of the near­by farm try to dis­tract her, yet the busy lit­tle spi­der keeps dili­gent­ly at her work. When she is done, she is able to show every­one that not only is her cre­ation quite beau­ti­ful, it is also quite use­ful!

WHALES

Amos & Boris

 

CLASSIC
Amos & Boris
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by William Steig
Far­rar, Straus and Giroux, 1971

Amos the mouse and Boris the whale: a devot­ed pair of friends with noth­ing at all in com­mon, except good hearts and a will­ing­ness to help their fel­low mam­mal. They meet after Amos sets out to sail the sea and finds him­self in extreme need of res­cue. And there will come a day, long after Boris has gone back to a life at sea and Amos has gone back to life on dry land, when the tiny mouse must find a way to res­cue the great whale.

Breathe

 

Breathe
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Scott Magoon
Simon & Schus­ter, 2004

A good book for young chil­dren, this looks at the life of a baby whale who ven­tures out on his own for the first time, engag­ing in adven­tures, and return­ing home to his mom.

Whales

 

Whales
writ­ten by Sey­mour Simon
Collins, 2006

This non­fic­tion book is full of infor­ma­tion about cows, calves, feed­ing, habi­tat, and the 90 species of whales around the world. From a mas­ter researcher and writer of non­fic­tion for young read­ers.

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The BEARdecotts

The ALA/ALSC recent­ly announced their Youth Media Awards, result­ing in much excite­ment.

The teacher librar­i­ans at a Min­neso­ta pri­vate school with three cam­pus­es help their stu­dents look for excel­lence in children’s books by hold­ing their own award process each year. Called The BEARde­cotts, after their school mas­cot, the edu­ca­tors select books for a short list that they then share with their stu­dents over sev­er­al months, read­ing aloud, read­ing indi­vid­u­al­ly, mak­ing crit­i­cal analy­ses, and final­ly vot­ing on the most wor­thy books.

Many of the choic­es this year reflect a theme of anx­i­ety, an emo­tion that is preva­lent among young stu­dents every­where.

The books in this year’s short list are list­ed below, in no par­tic­u­lar order.

The win­ners at the two ele­men­tary schools are:

Pota­to Pants! by Lau­rie Keller and Drawn Togeth­er by Minh Le and Dan San­tat

Is this a lit­er­a­cy expe­ri­ence you’d like to repli­cate in your school?

Patchwork Bike  

Patch­work Bike
writ­ten by Max­ine Bene­ba Clark
illus­trat­ed by Van Thanh Rudd
Can­dlewick Press, 2018

 

Sea Creatures from the Sky  

Sea Crea­tures from the Sky
Writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Ricar­do Cortés
Black Sheep, 2018

 

Shaking Things Up  

Shak­ing Things Up:
14 Young Women Who Changed the World

writ­ten by Susan Hood
illus­trat­ed by 13 Extra­or­di­nary Women: Seli­na Alko, Sophie Black­all, Lisa Brown, Hadley Hoop­er, Emi­ly Win­field Mar­tin, Oge Mora, Julie Morstad, Sara Pala­cios, LeUyen Pham, Erin Robin­son, Isabel Rox­as, Shadra Strick­land, and Melis­sa Sweet
HarperCollins,2018

Imagine

 

Imag­ine
writ­ten by Juan Felippe Her­rera
illus­trat­ed by Lau­ren Castil­lo
Can­dlewick Press, 2018

Read Bookol­o­gy’s rec­om­men­da­tion for this book.

Wall in the Middle of This Book  

Wall in the Mid­dle of the Book
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Jon Agee
Dial Books, 2018

 

Julian is a Mermaid  

Julián is a Mer­maid 
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Jes­si­ca Love
Can­dlewick Press, 2018

 

A Big Moon Cake for Little Star

 

A Big Moon­cake for Lit­tle Star
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Grace Lin
Lit­tle Brown, 2018

Potato Pants!

 

Pota­to Pants!
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Lau­rie Keller
Hen­ry Holt, 2018

The top choice by stu­dents at one of the two ele­men­tary schools, win­ner of the 2019 Bearde­cott.

Me and My Fear

 

Me and My Fear
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Francesca San­na
Fly­ing Eye Books, 2018

Drawn Together

 

Drawn Togeth­er
writ­ten by Minh Le
illus­trat­ed by Dan San­tat
Disney/Hyperion, 2018

The top choice by stu­dents at one of the two ele­men­tary schools, win­ner of the 2019 Bearde­cott.

 

 

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Poetry Books That Celebrate
African American History and Culture

Poet­ry and the spo­ken word have promi­nent places in African Amer­i­can cul­ture, due at least in part to a strong oral tra­di­tion that has been passed down through gen­er­a­tions. Con­sid­er includ­ing poems from the books below in your read-alouds this month, and the year ahead, as a way to high­light the con­tri­bu­tions of African Amer­i­cans to our nation’s his­to­ry and cul­ture. These pic­ture books offer options for intro­duc­ing your audi­ences (of any age) to the works of some out­stand­ing African Amer­i­can writ­ers and illus­tra­tors.

Brothers & Sisters Family Poems  

Broth­ers and Sis­ters: Fam­i­ly Poems
Writ­ten by Eloise Green­field
Illus­trat­ed by Jan Spivey Gilchrist
Harper­Collins Children’s Books, 2009

This book cel­e­brates the uni­ver­sal joys and chal­lenges of being a part of a fam­i­ly, includ­ing thoughts on rec­on­cil­ing griev­ances, get­ting along with old­er, younger, or step sib­lings, and being a twin. Just about every­one who has a broth­er or sis­ter can prob­a­bly find some­thing that res­onates with them among the poems in this book.

Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Boy  

Thir­teen Ways of Look­ing at a Black Boy
Writ­ten by Tony Med­i­na
Illus­trat­ed by 13 dif­fer­ent artists
Pen­ny Can­dy Books, 2018

Tony Med­i­na wrote the poems in this book in tan­ka form, a kind of Japan­ese poem that starts out like haiku (three lines with five, sev­en, and five syl­la­bles respec­tive­ly) but then adds two more lines with sev­en syl­la­bles each. Kids will find many of the poems relat­able, with top­ics such as miss­ing the bus (“Athlete’s Broke Bus Blues”) and want­i­ng to be a rap star (“Givin’ Back to the Com­mu­ni­ty”).

Pass It On  

Pass It On: African Amer­i­can Poet­ry for Chil­dren
Select­ed by Wade Hud­son
Illus­trat­ed by Floyd Coop­er
Scholas­tic Inc., 1993

This col­lec­tion includes beau­ti­ful­ly illus­trat­ed works by pro­lif­ic poets such as Langston Hugh­es, Gwen­dolyn Brooks, Nik­ki Gio­van­ni, Eloise Green­field, and Nik­ki Grimes. A theme of deter­mi­na­tion emerges from a num­ber of the selec­tions includ­ing: “I Can,” “Mid­way,” “The Dream Keep­er,” and “Lis­ten Chil­dren.”

Poems in the Attic

 

Poems in the Attic
Writ­ten by Nik­ki Grimes
Illus­trat­ed by Eliz­a­beth Zunon

For this book, Grimes drew on her own expe­ri­ence mov­ing fre­quent­ly as a child and rely­ing on writ­ing to help her cope. The book is a fic­tion­al account of a child who grew up with par­ents serv­ing in the U.S. mil­i­tary. Her poems in this pic­ture book remind us that although we can’t often choose our cir­cum­stances we can choose how we respond to them.

Seeing into Tomorrow  

See­ing into Tomor­row: Haiku by Richard Wright
Biog­ra­phy and illus­tra­tions by Nina Crews
Mill­brook Press, 2018

Select­ed from the thou­sands of haiku that Richard Wright wrote in his last years, these poems have uni­ver­sal appeal. Each is paired with a pho­to col­lage that helps read­ers visu­al­ize Wright’s mem­o­ries of grow­ing up in the rur­al South.

Words with Wings  

Words with Wings:
A Trea­sury of African-Amer­i­can Poet­ry and Art
Select­ed by Belin­da Rochelle
Harper­Collins Pub­lish­ers, 2001

This stel­lar col­lec­tion con­tains twen­ty poems by well-known poets, each paired with a bold, endur­ing work by a visu­al artist. The poet­ry and art inspire the imag­i­na­tion as they cap­ture a vari­ety of expe­ri­ences shared by all peo­ple and allow the read­er to look at the world through the eyes of a num­ber of dif­fer­ent artists. Poems by a num­ber of children’s authors are fea­tured in this book as well as ones by authors such as Maya Angelou and Alice Walk­er.

 

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Books about Somali Immigrants/Refugees

In an effort to help my chil­dren under­stand more about their own her­itage, I have searched far and wide for books by or about Soma­li immi­grants or refugees. Here are some of the best ones we have found. Though a num­ber of these titles have not been writ­ten by Soma­lis, they have at least been informed by input from mem­bers of this com­mu­ni­ty.

The Colour of Home  

The Colour of Home
Writ­ten by Mary Hoff­man
Illus­trat­ed by Karin Lit­tle­wood
Frances Lin­coln Pub­lish­ers Ltd., 2002

For ages 5 to 8, The Colour of Home shares the sto­ry of Has­san, a young Soma­li who had recent­ly arrived in a cold, gray, unfa­mil­iar coun­try. At school Has­san paint­ed a pic­ture of the home he missed, com­plete with a bright blue sky, all the mem­bers of his fam­i­ly, their sheep and goats, and this cat. His teacher com­pli­ment­ed his work, but then Has­san made the sky dark, and added a man with a gun and blotch­es of red on the walls of their home. He smudged out one of the fam­i­ly mem­bers. Hassan’s teacher arranged for a trans­la­tor to help him share more about his paint­ing with his teacher. With a hope­ful end­ing, the sto­ry offers a sen­si­tive treat­ment of a dif­fi­cult sub­ject and hints at the pow­er­ful role art can play in help­ing chil­dren heal from trau­ma. It per­son­al­izes the tragedy of fam­i­lies hav­ing to leave their homes in order to sur­vive, a nar­ra­tive too-often replayed in var­i­ous coun­tries around the world.

Come Sit Down  

Come Sit Down (Soo Fari­ista)
Writ­ten by Soma­li Youth in Muse­ums par­tic­i­pants
Min­neso­ta His­tor­i­cal Soci­ety, 2018

Nine high school stu­dents who par­tic­i­pat­ed in the Soma­li Youth in Muse­ums pro­gram devel­oped this Soma­li Amer­i­can cook­book as “an invi­ta­tion to get to know us through our sto­ries about our lives, our fam­i­lies, and our kitchens.” Stu­dents inter­viewed fam­i­ly mem­bers and test­ed recipes as they set out to pre­serve their culi­nary lega­cy. The hap­py result is a book of sev­en­ty recipes, acces­si­ble to those in the mid­dle grades and above. The book opens with a brief intro­duc­tion to Soma­li cul­ture and his­to­ry as well as infor­ma­tion about the Soma­li dias­po­ra. Many of the recipes are quite authen­tic, though oth­ers have been adapt­ed based on “Amer­i­can real­i­ties.” Most of the recipes are easy to make, though a few of them lack the lev­el of speci­fici­ty need­ed to suc­cess­ful­ly com­plete the recipe, unless you have pri­or knowl­edge of the cui­sine. If you and your kids want to try one dish from this book, choose the aro­mat­ic rice (page 134). It’s the real deal — but you’ll prob­a­bly want to cut the recipe in half at least, unless you’re hav­ing a par­ty.

Dhegdeer  

Dhegdeer, a Scary Soma­li Folk­tale
Retold by Mar­i­an A. Has­san
Illus­trat­ed by Bet­sy Bowen
Min­neso­ta Human­i­ties Com­mis­sion, 2007

The most well-known sto­ry from Soma­li folk­lore, the tale of Dhegdheer, has tra­di­tion­al­ly been used to scare chil­dren into good behav­ior. Dhegdheer is a can­ni­bal with a long pointy ear and excep­tion­al­ly good hear­ing. In fact, she can “hear even the gait of camels a half-day’s jour­ney away.” Hassan’s ver­sion of this sto­ry has been toned down some­what to make it a lit­tle less scary, but the illus­tra­tions may be a bit much for young chil­dren with strong imag­i­na­tions. Still, good wins over evil, and the book touch­es on the theme of uni­ver­sal jus­tice at work in the world. This is one of four bilin­gual books in the Min­neso­ta Human­i­ties Commission’s Soma­li Bilin­gual Book Project, most suit­able for ages 5 to 8 years. A down­load­able PDF of the book is avail­able from The Min­neso­ta Human­i­ties Cen­ter.

From Somalia, With Love

 

From Soma­lia, with Love
Writ­ten by Na’ima B. Robert
Frances Lin­coln Children’s Books, 2008

This young adult nov­el begins with 14-year-old Safia learn­ing that her father, from whom she had been sep­a­rat­ed for over a decade due to the Soma­li civ­il war, is com­ing to join his fam­i­ly in East Lon­don. Rather than feel­ing joy­ful, like her moth­er and old­est broth­er, Safia is anx­ious. How would things change when she’s reunit­ed with the father she doesn’t know? Many of the ques­tions and doubts that emerge in this fic­tion­al account will res­onate with near­ly any­one who has ever had con­cerns about fit­ting in among peers (most of us). Though clas­sic ele­ments of the immi­grant expe­ri­ence are con­tained in the nar­ra­tive, there are added lay­ers of chal­lenge because out­ward appear­ance pre­vents Safia from eas­i­ly blend­ing in with the host cul­ture.

The moth­er in the sto­ry astute­ly describes how many Soma­li immi­grants feel when she states, “Now, we live in Britain, Cana­da, Amer­i­ca, Hol­land, and we look at our chil­dren and we see strangers. We don’t under­stand the ways of these coun­tries; they are not our ways…”

Her daugh­ter sum­ma­rizes the feel­ing of the next gen­er­a­tion when she replies, “But we’re the ones who have to live here…We’re the ones who have to find who we are…and it’s hard to be dif­fer­ent all the time, it’s hard to feel like you don’t belong any­where.”

The Lion's Share  

The Lion’s Share
Retold by Said Salah Ahmed
Illus­trat­ed by Kel­ly Dupre
Min­neso­ta Human­i­ties Com­mis­sion, 2007

In this fable about the mis­use of pow­er, the lion demands a share of food he didn’t even help cap­ture. The oth­er ani­mals learn that the lion is not one with whom they can argue, so they give in to his demands, all the while chant­i­ng, “The lion’s share is not fair.” This is one of four bilin­gual books in the Min­neso­ta Human­i­ties Commission’s Soma­li Bilin­gual Book Project, most suit­able for ages 5 to 8 years. A down­load­able PDF of the book is avail­able.

The Ogress and the Snake  

The Ogress and the Snake
and oth­er sto­ries from Soma­lia
Retold by Eliz­a­beth Laird
Illus­trat­ed by Shel­ley Fowles
Frances Lin­coln Children’s Books, 2009

Author Eliz­a­beth Laird apt­ly calls the cre­ation of this book a “sto­ry-col­lect­ing project.” Accom­pa­nied by a trans­la­tor, Laird trav­elled to the Soma­li region of Ethiopia to hear the sto­ries first hand, in their orig­i­nal con­text, and then pro­duced this 97-page book. It is prob­a­bly one of the best col­lec­tion of Soma­li folk­tales in print. After read­ing the book togeth­er as a fam­i­ly, we have come to incor­po­rate ref­er­ences to sev­er­al of the char­ac­ters into our fam­i­ly dis­course, most notably Daya Ali, the tricky fox, and two under­hand­ed shop­keep­ers, Slip­pery Hir­si and Crooked Kabaalaf, who were both out­smart­ed as they attempt­ed to out­smart each oth­er. Any of the sto­ries in this mid­dle-grades col­lec­tion would be a fun read-aloud, reveal­ing aspects of Soma­li cul­ture and val­ues while enter­tain­ing lis­ten­ers.

Travels of Igal Shidad  

The Trav­els of Igal Shi­dad
Retold by Kel­ly Dupre; Soma­li trans­la­tion by Said Salah Ahmed
Illus­trat­ed by Amin Amir
Min­neso­ta Human­i­ties Com­mis­sion, 2008

A nomadic herder, Igal Shi­dad roamed the land in order to find water and grass for his camels and sheep. Among the Soma­li peo­ple, Igal Shi­dad is known as a wise cow­ard. In this sto­ry, his fear turns out to be unfound­ed — he’s afraid of a lion that turns out to be only a tree stump. In the end, he’s able to shrug off his mis­take, thank­ful that his prayers had been answered. This is one of four bilin­gual books in the Min­neso­ta Human­i­ties Commission’s Soma­li Bilin­gual Book Project, most suit­able for ages 5 to 8 years. A down­load­able PDF of the book is avail­able.

When I Get Older  

When I Get Old­er: the Sto­ry Behind “Wavin’ Flag”
Writ­ten by K’naan with Sol Guy
Illus­trat­ed by Rudy Gutier­rez
Tun­dra Books, 2012

Song­writer and hip-hop artist K’naan wrote an auto­bi­o­graph­i­cal sto­ry about hav­ing to leave Soma­lia at 13 years of age because civ­il war had bro­ken out. His grand­fa­ther, who stayed behind in their home coun­try, had giv­en the boy a poem of hope before they were sep­a­rat­ed: “When I get old­er, I will be stronger. They’ll call me free­dom, just like a wav­ing flag.” This is the poem the boy hung on to while he stayed with his uncle in Harlem and then when he and his fam­i­ly set­tled in Toron­to, Cana­da. K’naan described some of the dif­fi­cul­ties he encoun­tered liv­ing in a new land, but he also showed how his poem set to music helped bridge the dif­fer­ences between him and his class­mates. This song, “Wavin’ Flag,” was select­ed as the anthem of the 2010 FIFA World Cup. (Con­sid­er lis­ten­ing to the song after read­ing this pic­ture book.)

Wiil Waal  

Wiil Waal: A Soma­li Folk­tale
Retold by Kath­leen Mori­ar­ty;
Soma­li trans­la­tion by Jamal Adam
Illus­trat­ed by Amin Amir
Min­neso­ta Human­i­ties Com­mis­sion, 2007

Wiil Waal is a folk­tale tru­ly root­ed in nomadic Soma­li cul­ture. Some of the details, such as the sym­bol­ism of a sheep’s gul­let as some­thing that can divide or unite peo­ple, may be lost on the aver­age West­ern read­er. What is clear in the sto­ry, how­ev­er, is that the daugh­ter of a poor shep­herd advances to a lead­er­ship posi­tion because of her wis­dom and her father’s choice to trust in that wis­dom. This is one of four bilin­gual books in the Min­neso­ta Human­i­ties Commission’s Soma­li Bilin­gual Book Project, most suit­able for ages 5 to 8 years. A down­load­able PDF of the book is avail­able.

 

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Earth Day

Whether you are cel­e­brat­ing Earth Day this week or next week or every week, there are books here that will enchant your stu­dents or your fam­i­ly, open­ing up pos­si­bil­i­ties for good dis­cus­sions.

 

Earth: My First 4.54 Bil­lion Years
Sta­cy McAn­ul­ty, author
James Litch­field, illus­tra­tor
Hen­ry Holt, 2017
pri­ma­ry and ele­men­tary grades

Told from the view­point of the anthro­po­mor­phic Earth itself, this book tells the life sto­ry of our home plan­et, intro­duc­ing it to “alien vis­i­tors.” As Earth says, “You can call me Plan­et Awe­some.” A gen­tle sense of humor and rich illus­tra­tions will engage Earth’s res­i­dents with lots of cool facts and engag­ing text.

Earth Day Every Day  

Earth Day Every Day
Lisa Bullard
Xin Zheng, illus­tra­tor
Mill­brook Press, 2011
pri­ma­ry grades

Tyler and Tri­na are on a mis­sion to save Earth. They apply what they’ve learned in school to earth-pre­serv­ing projects such as recy­cling, sav­ing ener­gy, con­serv­ing water, and cel­e­brat­ing Earth Day.

Earth Verse: Haiku from the Ground Up  

Earth Verse: Haiku from the Ground Up
Sal­ly M. Walk­er, author
William Grill, illus­tra­tor
Can­dlewick Press, 2018
pri­ma­ry grades and up

In haiku verse, Sal­ly M. Walk­er pro­vokes young read­ers to think about our earth from a sci­ence view­point. “Frag­ile out­er crust / shell around man­tle and core– / Earth a hard-boiled egg. It’s always fun to chal­lenge stu­dents to write in 17 syl­la­bles … Walk­er shines a bright flash­light on the path. William Grill’s col­ored pen­cil illus­tra­tions will be inspi­ra­tional, too.

 

Earthshake: Poems from the Ground Up

 

Earth­shake: Poems from the Ground Up
Lisa West­berg Peters, author
Cathie Fel­stead, illus­tra­tor
Green­wil­low Books, 2003
grades 4 and up

A delight­ful col­lec­tion of poems that intro­duce and inte­grate into lessons on earth sci­ence, geol­o­gy, geog­ra­phy, and ecol­o­gy. Often humor­ous, the poems are wor­thy of re-read­ing. The col­lage illus­tra­tions deep­en the reader’s under­stand­ing of the poet­ry; they invite care­ful study.

Here We Are  

Here We Are: Notes for Liv­ing on Plan­et Earth
Oliv­er Jef­fers, author and illus­tra­tor
Philomel, 2017
preschool through ele­men­tary

The author wel­comes his young child to the world with paint­ings of the cos­mos, the land and sea and incred­u­lous fea­tures of this Earth. It’s a beau­ti­ful book to share with young chil­dren and to dis­cuss with old­er chil­dren what the Earth means to them and why they appre­ci­ate it.

Hundred Billion Trillion Stars  

Hun­dred Bil­lion Tril­lion Stars
Seth Fish­man, author
Isabel Green­berg, illus­tra­tor
Green­wil­low Books, 2017
pri­ma­ry grades and up

This is a play­ful book, both in text and illus­tra­tions, that will sat­is­fy young minds hun­ger­ing for facts, math, and absorbable infor­ma­tion about our plan­et, Earth. Fas­ci­nat­ed by real­ly big num­bers? How many stars in the uni­verse? How many trees on Earth? In his author’s note, Mr. Fish­man says that these num­bers are “sort-of-def­i­nite­ly-ALMOST true,” but pin­point accu­ra­cy is not the point. The scope, the mag­nif­i­cence, the under­stand­ing of the grandeur of our Earth … that’s the sto­ry here.

On the Day You Were Born  

On the Day You Were Born
Debra Frasi­er, author and illus­tra­tor
Houghton Mif­flin Har­court, 1991
all ages

Although this book is often giv­en as a baby’s birth present, it is a good choice for Earth Day read-alouds and dis­cus­sions, rev­el­ing in all of the Earth’s won­ders along­side the humans who are its care­tak­ers. There is a detailed glos­sary explain­ing such nat­ur­al phe­nom­e­na as grav­i­ty, tides, and migra­tion, so it works well for the class­room.

Our Big Home  

Our Big Home
Lin­da Glaser, author
Elisa Kleven, illus­tra­tor
Mill­brook Press, 2002
all ages

This pic­ture book cel­e­brates that all liv­ing things on Earth are inter­con­nect­ed and how the Earth sup­ports our lives. The illus­tra­tions are gor­geous. There’s a strong sense of respect for life and joy in being alive.

Thank You, Earth  

Thank You, Earth: a Love Let­ter to Our Plan­et
April Pul­ley Sayre, author and pho­tog­ra­ph­er
Green­wil­low Books, 2018
pri­ma­ry grades and up

Per­haps inspir­ing your stu­dents’ own thank you notes, the author shares her pho­tographs and a poet­ic text that thank the Earth for its stun­ning beau­ty and life-giv­ing resources. Won­der­ful­ly clear pho­tographs are inspir­ing and large enough for shar­ing. A rec­om­mend­ed pri­ma­ry and ele­men­tary school book that intro­duce con­cepts of sci­ence, nature, geog­ra­phy, biol­o­gy, poet­ry, and com­mu­ni­ty.

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In Memoriam: Wendy Watson

Wendy Wat­son was a third gen­er­a­tion author and artist. Her grand­par­ents, Ernest W. Wat­son and Eva Auld Wat­son, were painters and pio­neer col­or block print­ers.  Ernest was also founder and edi­tor of the mag­a­zine Amer­i­can Artist, co-founder of Wat­son-Gup­till Pub­li­ca­tions, and co-founder of one of the first sum­mer art schools, the Berk­shire Sum­mer School of Art. Wendy’s father, Aldren A. Wat­son, is an author, and also the illus­tra­tor of more than 175 books, includ­ing many children’s books writ­ten by Wendy’s moth­er, Nan­cy Ding­man Wat­son.

Wendy received her pri­ma­ry edu­ca­tion and ear­ly art train­ing from her par­ents. She lat­er stud­ied paint­ing and draw­ing with Jer­ry Farnsworth, Helen Sawyer, and Daniel Greene, and received a BA in Latin Lit­er­a­ture from Bryn Mawr Col­lege.

Wendy was the author-illus­tra­tor of twen­ty-one books for chil­dren, and the illus­tra­tor of over six­ty books for oth­er authors. Her books have received many awards and hon­ors, includ­ing: The Nation­al Book Award, nom­i­nee; The Koret Jew­ish Book Award; The Syd­ney Tay­lor Hon­or Book Award; Best Books of the Year, The New York Times; Best Books of the Year, Amer­i­can Library Asso­ci­a­tion; Best Books of the Year, School Library Jour­nal; Best Books of the Year, Pub­lish­ers Week­lyKirkus Reviews Editor’s Choice; Notable Children’s Books, Amer­i­can Library Asso­ci­a­tion; Out­stand­ing Sci­ence Trade Books for Chil­dren, Nation­al Sci­ence Teach­ers Association/Children’s Book Coun­cil; Pick of the Lists, Amer­i­can Bookseller’s Asso­ci­a­tion; and Notable Children’s Books in the Field of Social Stud­ies, Children’s Book Coun­cil.

Wendy’s art­work was exhib­it­ed wide­ly, and includ­ed in numer­ous nation­al and inter­na­tion­al shows, includ­ing: “The Bien­ni­al of Illus­tra­tion,” Bratisla­va, Yugoslavia; “The Orig­i­nal Art,” The Soci­ety of Illus­tra­tors, New York; and “The Annu­al Exhi­bi­tion of Amer­i­can Illus­tra­tion,” The Soci­ety of Illus­tra­tors, New York. She was one of 106 artists rep­re­sent­ed in the exhi­bi­tion and book “Myth, Mag­ic, and Mys­tery: One Hun­dred Years of Amer­i­can Children’s Book Illus­tra­tion.” Wendy’s work is part of numer­ous pri­vate and insti­tu­tion­al col­lec­tions.

Wendy was also a mem­ber of the Author’s Guild, the Soci­ety of Children’s Book Writ­ers and Illus­tra­tors, and The Soci­ety of Illus­tra­tors. She lived in Phoenix, Ari­zona, and Cape Cod, Mass­a­chu­setts. She passed away in Feb­ru­ary 2018 and will be held dear in the hearts of many friends and rel­a­tives.

Here are Wendy Wat­son’s pub­lished works:

 

Bed­time Bun­nies
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Clar­i­on Books, 2010
ISBN 9780547223124

It’s always some­body’s bed­time, some­where in the world. In this book it’s bed­time for five lit­tle rab­bits. They come in from out­doors, have a snack, brush their teeth, take a bath, put on night­clothes, and lis­ten to a sto­ry before being tucked in for the night. Out­side, we see snowflakes falling. In the bun­nies’ home, all is warmth and cozi­ness and play­ful­ness and love. Four words per spread nar­rate the evening rou­tine, and delight­ful­ly soft and spir­it­ed illus­tra­tions take read­ers into the bun­nies’ world. Young chil­dren who have this book as a bed­time com­pan­ion are lucky indeed, espe­cial­ly if their own get­ting-ready-for-bed rit­u­als are as famil­iar and ten­der as those of the five bun­nies.

 

Spuds
writ­ten by Karen Hesse

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Scholas­tic Press, 2008
ISBN 9780439879934

Ma’s been work­ing so hard, she does­n’t have much left over. So her three kids decide to do some work on their own. In the dark of night, they steal into their rich neigh­bor’s pota­to fields in hopes of col­lect­ing the strays that have been left to rot. They dig flat-bel­lied in the dirt, hid­ing from pass­ing cars, and drag a sack of spuds through the frost back home. But in the light, the sad truth is revealed: their bag is full of stones! Ma is upset when she sees what they’ve done, and makes them set things right. But in a sur­prise twist, they learned they have helped the farmer….

 

The Cats in Krasin­s­ki Square
writ­ten by Karen Hesse
illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Scholas­tic Press, 2004
ISBN 9780439435406 

In lumi­nous free verse, Hes­se’s lat­est pic­ture book tells a pow­er­ful sto­ry of a young Jew­ish girl who, togeth­er with her old­er sis­ter, inge­nious­ly fights the Nazi occu­pa­tion of War­saw. After escap­ing from the Jew­ish ghet­to, the girl avoids detec­tion.… She finds joy in play­ing with the city’s aban­doned cats, who show her holes in the ghet­to wall, which the girl’s old­er sis­ter and their resis­tance friends will use to pass sup­plies shipped by train to War­saw. The Gestapo learns of the scheme, and sol­diers wait at the train sta­tion with dogs. Luck­i­ly, the cats inspire a solu­tion; they dis­tract the dogs and pro­tect the sup­plies. It’s an empow­er­ing sto­ry about the brav­ery and impact of young peo­ple, and Hes­se’s clear, spare poet­ry, from the girl’s view­point, refers to the hard­ships suf­fered with­out didac­ti­cism. In bold, black lines and wash­es of smoky gray and ochre, Wat­son’s arrest­ing images echo the pared-down lan­guage as well as the hope that shines like the glints of sun­light on Krasin­s­ki Square. An author’s note ref­er­ences the true events and heart­break­ing his­to­ry that inspired this stir­ring, expert­ly craft­ed sto­ry.

 

Father Fox’s Christ­mas Rhymes
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Far­rar, Straus & Giroux, 2003
ISBN 9780374375768

A cozy col­lec­tion of hol­i­day verse.

Who is that knock­ing at the door?
It’s old Father Fox with sur­pris­es galore!
Licorice & lol­lipops, lemons & limes
A bun­dle of toys & a bag full of rhymes …

Over thir­ty years ago, Father Fox’s Pen­nyrhymes became an instant clas­sic and was a Nation­al Book Award Final­ist. Now Father Fox returns with new rhymes espe­cial­ly for yule­tide that con­jure up the excite­ment and mys­tery of the sea­son: play­ing in the snow, mak­ing hot apple cider, hid­ing presents — all at the warm and lov­ing home of the Fox fam­i­ly.

The vers­es feel like clas­sic children’s rhymes, and rich paint­ings cap­ture all the cheer and beau­ty of Christ­mas­time.

 

Rab­bit Moon
writ­ten by Patri­cia Hubbell

illus­tra­tions by Wendy Wat­son
Mar­shall Cavendish, 2002
ISBN 9780761451037

Con­sid­er Rab­bit snow­men in Feb­ru­ary! Can you imag­ine Rab­bit pipers in March?! An engag­ing col­lec­tion of poems for preschool­ers and ear­ly read­ers, this unique almanac cel­e­brates the hol­i­days and good times enjoyed by young Rab­bits and chil­dren alike. From Rab­bit Lead­ers Day to Rab­bit Thanks­giv­ing, from Rab­bit fire­works in July to Rab­bit trick-or-treat in Octo­ber, all the spe­cial days of the year are here. And, as Big-Rab­bit-in-the-Moon looks on, all are enjoyed. Adding to the fun are play­ful illus­tra­tions (ren­dered in acrylics and India ink) of Rab­bits here, Rab­bits there, Rab­bits every­where!

 

Hol­ly’s Christ­mas Eve
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Harper­Collins, 2002
ISBN 9780688176525

On Christ­mas Eve, Hol­ly is ready to join the oth­er orna­ments in cel­e­bra­tion. But dis­as­ter strikes when naughty Bad Cat bats the tree’s branch­es: Hol­ly los­es her wood­en arm! Cloth Bear and Tin Horse rush to help her find it, meet­ing dan­ger and becom­ing good friends along the way.

Wendy Wat­son’s paint­ings glow with excite­ment as the trio hur­ries to get home safe­ly before San­ta arrives.

This heart­warm­ing sto­ry, filled with adven­ture, is per­fect for read­ing aloud by the light of your own tree at Christ­mas­time.

 

Is My Friend at Home?: Pueblo Fire­side Tales
writ­ten by John Bier­horst

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Far­rar, Straus & Giroux, 2001
ISBN 9780374335502

Here are sev­en inter­con­nect­ed sto­ries about mak­ing and keep­ing friends, jew­el-like tales orig­i­nal­ly told to the youngest lis­ten­ers at Native Amer­i­can fire­sides in the Hopi coun­try of north­ern Ari­zona. In John Bier­horst’s authen­tic re-cre­ation of a Pueblo sto­ry­telling ses­sion, read­ers and lis­ten­ers will find out how Coy­ote got his short ears, why Mouse walks soft­ly, and how Bee learned to fly.

Snake, Mole, Bad­ger, Bee­tle, and Dove also have roles clever and fool­ish, friend­ly and not so friend­ly, and all are depict­ed with humor and finesse by illus­tra­tor Wendy Wat­son.

 

Love’s a Sweet
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Viking Pen­guin, 1998
ISBN 9780670834532

Ani­mals of every sort quar­rel and kiss, laugh and lul­la­by their way through the plea­sures and pit­falls of every­day love in this new col­lec­tion of short rhymes writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by sis­ters Clyde and Wendy Wat­son. Each of Clyde’s “pen­nyrhymes” is illus­trat­ed with fun­ny, often ten­der scenes fea­tur­ing Wendy’s fuzzy farm ani­mals. Love’s A Sweet is the per­fect book for chil­dren to share with moms, dads, broth­ers, sis­ters, and espe­cial­ly with grand­ma and grand­pa!

no cov­er
image avail­able
 

Du Store Ver­den (orig. Nor­we­gian ed.)
writ­ten by Kather­ine Pater­son et al.
illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
J.W. Cap­pe­lens For­lag a‑s, 1995

No syn­op­sis yet.

 

Fox Went Out on a Chilly Night
edit­ed and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Lothrop, Lee & Shep­ard, 1994
no ISBN yet

An illus­trat­ed ver­sion of the folk song in which a fox trav­els many miles to get din­ner for his wife and ten cubs.

 

The Big Book for Our Plan­et
edit­ed by Ann Dur­rell, Jean Craig­head George, and Kather­ine Pater­son
illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Dut­ton Chil­dren’s Books, 1993
ISBN 9780525451198

More than forty acclaimed chil­dren’s book authors and illus­tra­tors join togeth­er to cre­ate an anthol­o­gy — whose pro­ceeds will ben­e­fit envi­ron­men­tal orga­ni­za­tions — of sto­ries, poems, essays, and pic­tures that cel­e­brate Earth and call atten­tion to envi­ron­men­tal destruc­tion.

 

Hap­py East­er Day!
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Clar­i­on Books, 1993
ISBN 9780395536292

A fam­i­ly pre­pares for a tra­di­tion­al Amer­i­can East­er by mak­ing hot cross buns, get­ting new clothes, and dec­o­rat­ing eggs. On the hol­i­day, they hunt for bas­kets, go to church, have din­ner, and play games. Songs and poems are inter­spersed through­out the text.

 

Boo! It’s Hal­loween
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Clar­i­on Books, 1992
ISBN 9780395536285

A fam­i­ly gets ready for Hal­loween by prepar­ing cos­tumes, mak­ing good­ies for the school par­ty, and carv­ing jack‑o’-lanterns. Hal­loween jokes and rhymes are inter­spersed through­out the text.

 

Hur­ray for the Fourth of July
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Clar­i­on Books, 1992
ISBN 9780618040360 (Sand­piper ed., 2000)

In a small Ver­mont town a fam­i­ly cel­e­brates the Fourth of July by attend­ing a parade, hav­ing a pic­nic, and watch­ing fire­works.

 

Thanks­giv­ing at Our House
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Clar­i­on Books, 1991
ISBN 9780395699447 (Sand­piper ed., 1994)

A spir­it­ed col­lec­tion of tra­di­tion­al rhymes woven into an orig­i­nal sto­ry.

 

A Valen­tine for You
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Clar­i­on Books, 1991
ISBN 9780395536254

A live­ly col­lec­tion of tra­di­tion­al Valen­tine rhymes cel­e­brates the fun a fam­i­ly can have prepar­ing for the hol­i­day.

 

The Night Before Christ­mas
writ­ten by Clement Clarke Moore

edit­ed and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Clar­i­on Books, 1990
ISBN 9780395665084 (Sand­piper ed., 1993)

The famil­iar verse about a vis­it from Saint Nick is depict­ed in a late-twen­ti­eth-cen­tu­ry small town set­ting, which brings to life the tra­di­tion­al Amer­i­can cel­e­bra­tion of a beloved hol­i­day.

 

Wendy Wat­son’s Frog Went A‑Courting
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
piano arr. by Paul Alan Levi
Lothrop, Lee & Shep­ard, 1990
ISBN 9780688065409

Presents the well-known folk song about the courtship and mar­riage of the frog and the mouse. Includes music.

 

A, B, C, D, Tum­my, Toes, Hands, Knees
writ­ten by Bar­bara Hen­nessey

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Viking Pen­guin, 1989
ISBN 9780670817030

A rhyth­mic, rhyming text lists objects, ideas, and actions; sim­ple vignettes and full-page draw­ings pro­vide the def­i­n­i­tions by show­ing famil­iar activ­i­ties and games enjoyed by a moth­er and child in the course of their day togeth­er.

 

Valen­tine Fox­es
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­tra­tions by Wendy Wat­son
Orchard Books, 1989
ISBN 9780531070338 (Orchard, 1992)

The Fox fam­i­ly’s genial dis­ar­ray is enlivened as the cubs pre­pare a spe­cial sur­prise. The book includes a recipe for Valen­tine Pound Cake.

 

 

Wendy Wat­son’s Moth­er Goose
edit­ed and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Lothrop, Lee & Shep­ard, 1989
ISBN 9780688057084

In this com­pre­hen­sive, lav­ish­ly illus­trat­ed vol­ume, Wat­son shares her beguil­ing vision of the time­less world of Moth­er Goose. A won­der­ful intro­duc­tion to the rich folk­lore of child­hood. Full-col­or illus­tra­tions.

no cov­er
image avail­able
 

How I Feel: Hap­py
writ­ten by Mar­cia Leonard

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Ban­tam, 1988
no ISBN yet

No syn­po­sis yet.

no cov­er
image avail­able
 

How I Feel: Sil­ly
writ­ten by Mar­cia Leonard

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Ban­tam, 1988
no ISBN yet

No syn­op­sis yet.

no cov­er
image avail­able
 

How I Feel: Sad
writ­ten by Mar­cia Leonard

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Ban­tam, 1988
no ISBN yet

No syn­op­sis yet.

 

How I Feel: Angry
writ­ten by Mar­cia Leonard

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Ban­tam, 1988
ISBN 9780553054828

Describes, in sim­ple terms, sit­u­a­tions which make us angry and how to cope with feel­ings of anger.

 

Tales For a Win­ter’s Eve
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Far­rar, Straus & Giroux, 1988
ISBN 9780374474195 (Sun­burst ed., 1991)

When Fred­die Fox injures his paw in a ski­ing acci­dent, his fam­i­ly and friends dis­tract him with sto­ries about the ani­mal inhab­i­tants of their vil­lage.

 

Doc­tor Coy­ote, A Native Amer­i­can Aesop’s Fable
writ­ten by John Bier­horst

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Macmil­lan, 1987
ISBN 9780027097801 

Coy­ote is fea­tured in each of these Aztec inter­pre­ta­tions of Aesop’s fables. The illus­tra­tions are set in the twen­ti­eth cen­tu­ry.

 

Lit­tle Brown Bear
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
West­ern Pub­lish­ing, 1985
ISBN 9780307030429

Lit­tle Brown Bear would like to go fish­ing with his father, but his par­ents think he’s too small.

 

Belin­da’s Hur­ri­cane
writ­ten by Eliz­a­beth Winthrop

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
E.P. Dut­ton, 1984
ISBN 9780525441069

While wait­ing out a fierce hur­ri­cane in her grand­moth­er’s house on Fox Island, Belin­da has a chance to get to know her grand­moth­er’s reclu­sive neigh­bor Mr. Fletch­er.

 

I Love My Baby Sis­ter: Most of the Time
writ­ten by Elaine Edel­man

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Lothrop, Lee & Shep­ard, 1984
ISBN 9780140505474 (Puf­fin ed., 1985)

A small girl looks for­ward to the time when her baby sis­ter will be big enough to play with and be friends with.

 

Hap­py Birth­day From Car­olyn Hay­wood
writ­ten by Car­olyn Hay­wood

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Mor­row Junior Books, 1984
ISBN 9780688027094

A col­lec­tion of nine sto­ries revolv­ing around the birth­day cel­e­bra­tions of a vari­ety of the author’s char­ac­ters, old and new.

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Christ­mas at Bun­ny’s Inn
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Philomel, 1984
ISBN 9780399210907

Pop-up book: A three-dimen­sion­al Advent cal­en­dar.

 

Father Fox’s Feast of Songs
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Philomel, 1983
ISBN 9780399208867

Here is a joy­ous col­lec­tion of songs for every fam­i­ly to enjoy togeth­er. Clyde Wat­son has cho­sen her favorites from the best-sell­ing nurs­ery rhyme books, Father Fox’s Pen­nyrhymes and Catch Me & Kiss Me & Say it Again, and set them to music in easy-to-play arrange­ments for voice, piano and gui­tar. Wendy Wat­son has illus­trat­ed her sis­ter’s songs with humor and affec­tion. Gath­er around the piano and sing— here are songs to cel­e­brate every aspect of hap­py child­hood and lov­ing fam­i­ly life.

 

Bet­sy’s Up-and-Down Year
writ­ten by Anne Pel­lows­ki

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Philomel, 1983
ISBN 9780399209703

The fur­ther adven­tures of Bet­sy on her fam­i­ly’s Wis­con­sin farm includ­ing her strug­gles with sib­ling rival­ry, an encounter with a rat­tlesnake, a birth­day par­ty, and cop­ing with the death of her grand­fa­ther.

 

The Bun­nies’ Christ­mas Eve (pop-up book)
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Philomel, 1983
ISBN 9780399209680

Bun­ny learns the true mean­ing of Christ­mas as she takes part in a spe­cial cer­e­mo­ny and fam­i­ly hol­i­day tra­di­tions, as depict­ed by stand-up illus­tra­tions with mov­ing parts.

 

Apple­bet, An ABC
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son
illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Far­rar, Straus & Giroux, 1982
ISBN 9780374404277

A is for apple as every­one knows
Can you fol­low this one wher­ev­er it goes? 
B is for Bet in the top of the tree
Who picked it & shined it & gave it to me.

A Library of Con­gress Chil­dren’s Book of the Year.

 

The Biggest, Mean­est, Ugli­est Dog in the Whole Wide World
writ­ten by Rebec­ca C. Jones

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Macmil­lan, 1982
ISBN 9780027478006

Jonathan is ter­ri­fied of the dog next door, until one day he throws his ball at it in defense and their rela­tion­ship changes.

 

First Farm in the Val­ley: Anna’s Sto­ry
writ­ten by Anne Pel­lows­ki

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Macmil­lan, 1982
ISBN 9780884895374 (St. Mary’s Press ed., 1998)

Anna, the Amer­i­can-born daugh­ter of Pol­ish immi­grants, longs to escape the rig­ors of Wis­con­sin farm life to vis­it the roman­ti­cized Poland of her dreams.

 

Wind­ing Val­ley Farm: Annie’s Sto­ry
writ­ten by Anne Pel­lows­ki

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Philomel, 1982
ISBN 9780399208638

Life for six-year-old Annie Dorawa on Wind­ing Val­ley Farm just down the road from the Pel­lowskis’ first farm in the val­ley is busy and hap­py. Then one day, Annie hears her father speak about not plant­i­ng that year, but instead mov­ing into town. Is it real­ly pos­si­ble that they might leave their beau­ti­ful farm? What could her father be think­ing about? This new anx­i­ety, along with that inner imp of mis­chief always threat­en­ing to get her into trou­ble (and which final­ly does when broth­er John is killing chick­ens at the chop­ping block), hov­er over Annie as she works and plays with her sis­ter and five broth­ers immersed in the vig­or­ous life of their Amer­i­can-Pol­ish com­mu­ni­ty. Despite the dis­cov­ery that life is not always easy or as she d like it to be, Annie begins to real­ize what warm secu­ri­ty is to be found in a hard­work­ing fam­i­ly root­ed in faith and love.

 

Stairstep Farm: Anna Rose’s Sto­ry
writ­ten by Anne Pel­lows­ki

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Philomel, 1981
ISBN 9780884895367 (St. Mary’s Press ed., 1998)

In the late 1930s, Annie’s daugh­ter Anna Rose, as well as her oth­er chil­dren, can make almost any chore an occa­sion for fun. But Anna Rose, who is busy enough with the farm work and a new baby sis­ter, dreams of start­ing school.

 

Wil­low Wind Farm: Bet­sy’s Sto­ry
writ­ten by Anne Pel­lows­ki

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Philomel, 1981
ISBN 9780399207815

Anna Rose’s sev­en-year-old niece Bet­sy has a spe­cial year, one in which all the rel­a­tives from near and far gath­er for a fam­i­ly reunion at her grand­par­en­t’s farm. Bet­sy then dis­cov­ers how nice it is to live at the heart of a large and lov­ing fam­i­ly.

 

Jamie’s Sto­ry
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Philomel, 1981
ISBN 9780399207891

Por­trays a day in the life of a tod­dler as he helps his moth­er and father, plays, and dis­cov­ers the world around him.

 

But­ton Eye­’s Orange
writ­ten by Jan Wahl

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Fred­er­ick Warne, 1980
ISBN 9780723261889

Tak­en to the mar­ket to be sold, a toy dog tries to return with an orange to his boy who wears a leg brace.

 

How Brown Mouse Kept Christ­mas
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Far­rar, Straus & Giroux, 1989
ISBN 9780374334949

On Christ­mas Eve the mice feast and make mer­ry around the fam­i­ly’s Christ­mas tree, in full view of the sleep­ing cat, and Brown Mouse inad­ver­tent­ly does a kind­ness for the fam­i­ly.

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Jen­ny’s Cat
writ­ten by Miska Miles

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Dut­ton, 1979
ISBN 9780553151251

Lone­ly in their new town, Jen­ny is delight­ed when a stray cat comes to their house, but her moth­er does­n’t want the cat to stay.

 

Catch Me & Kiss Me & Say It Again
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1978
ISBN 9780399219948

Thir­ty-two rhymes for the very young includ­ing count­ing rhymes, lul­la­bies, and games.

 

Has Win­ter Come?
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son

Philomel, 1978
ISBN 9780529054395

Although the chil­dren don’t rec­og­nize the faint smell of win­ter in the air, a wood­chuck fam­i­ly begins prepar­ing for long snowy nights.

 

Mov­ing
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1978
ISBN 9780690013269

When Mom and Dad make plans to move to a new house, Muf­fin decides to remain in the old one.

 

Bina­ry Num­bers
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­soni
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1977
ISBN 9780690009927

Intro­duces the prin­ci­ple and uses of bina­ry num­bers.

 

Maps, Tracks, and the Bridges of Konigs­berg
writ­ten by Michael Holt

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1976
ISBN 9780690007466

Offers a basic expla­na­tion of graph the­o­ry.

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Christ­mas All Around the House:
Christ­mas Dec­o­ra­tions You Can Make
writ­ten by Flo­rence Pet­tit

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1976
ISBN 9780690010138

Instruc­tions for mak­ing a vari­ety of Christ­mas dec­o­ra­tions, crafts, and foods that orig­i­nat­ed in dif­fer­ent parts of the world.

 

Hick­o­ry Stick Rag
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1976
ISBN 9780690009590

Recounts, in rhyme, the good and bad events of a school year for the young ani­mal chil­dren.

 

Lol­lipop
writ­ten and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1976
ISBN 9780690007688

Bun­ny goes through a lot before he final­ly gets his lol­lipop.

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Heart’s Ease, A Lit­tle Book of Ten­der Thoughts
writ­ten by ???????

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Peter Pau­per Press, 1975
no ISBN yet

No syn­op­sis yet.

 

Quips & Quirks
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Crow­ell, 1975
ISBN 9780690007336

Briefly defines a num­ber of names used to tease or insult for a hun­dred years or more. Includes rub­ber­neck, flib­ber­ti­gib­bet, trolly­bags, and many more.

 

Muncus Agrun­cus: a Bad Lit­tle Mouse
writ­ten by Nan­cy D. Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1975
ISBN 9780307125408

Always fond of adven­ture, Muncus Agrun­cus spends much of his time pur­su­ing and escap­ing from mis­chief.

 

Sleep Is For Every­one
writ­ten by Paul Show­ers

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1974
ISBN 9780064451413

Bed­time often seems to come too ear­ly, but what would hap­pen if you nev­er went to sleep? When sci­en­tists decid­ed to find out, they dis­cov­ered that your brain needs a rest after a long day of think­ing, just as your mus­cles would need a rest after a long day of work.
A dif­fer­ent kind of bed­time sto­ry, this book is the per­fect response to the ques­tion — Can’t I stay up a lit­tle longer?’

 

The Birth­day Goat
writ­ten by Nan­cy D. Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son 
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1974
ISBN 9780333174838

The Goat fam­i­ly enjoys its out­ing to the Car­ni­val until Baby Souci goat is kid­napped.

 

Upside Down and Inside Out
writ­ten by Bob­bie Katz

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Franklin Watts, 1973
ISBN 9781563971228

Spec­u­lates in verse on the many ways the world could be turned upside down, inside out, and oth­er­wise mixed up.

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Ani­mal Gar­den
writ­ten by Ogden Nash

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Andre Deutsch, Lon­don, 1972
no ISBN yet

No syn­op­sis yet.

 

Open the Door and See All the Peo­ple
writ­ten by Clyde Robert Bul­la

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1972
ISBN 9780690600452

After los­ing every­thing they own, includ­ing their dolls, when their house burns down, two sis­ters learn about a place where they can adopt dolls.

 

Tom Fox and the Apple Pie
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1972
ISBN 9780690827835

Tom Fox goes to the Fair to bring back an apple pie for his fam­i­ly.

 

Prob­a­bil­i­ty
writ­ten by Charles Linn

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1972
ISBN 9780690656015

Sim­ple exper­i­ments with eas­i­ly avail­able mate­ri­als explain the the­o­ry of prob­a­bil­i­ty and how it is used by sci­en­tists, poll-tak­ers, and indus­tri­al­ists.

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A Gift of Mistle­toe
writ­ten by ?????

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Peter Pau­per Press, 1971
no ISBN yet

No syn­op­sis yet.

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Amer­i­ca! Amer­i­ca!
writ­ten by ???????

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Peter Pau­per Press, 1971
no ISBN yet

No syn­op­sis yet.

 

Life’s Won­drous Ways
writ­ten by ???????

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Peter Pau­per Press, 1971
no ISBN yet

No syn­op­sis yet.

 

Father Fox’s Pen­nyrhymes
writ­ten by Clyde Wat­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Thomas Y. Crow­ell, 1971
ISBN 9780060295011 (Harper­Collins ed., 2001)

(Syn­op­sis for the 2001 edi­tion.)

Life pro­claimed this long-unavail­able clas­sic the “first authen­ti­cal­ly col­lo­qui­al and breezi­ly Amer­i­can nurs­ery rhyme” when it was pub­lished in 1971. Now it is back for new gen­er­a­tions to enjoy!

All of Clyde Water­son­’s vers­es have what School Library Jour­nal calls the “foot-stomp­ing rhythm of an Amer­i­can square dance call.” Some feel cozy and nos­tal­gic; oth­ers are sil­ly. Many evoke the plea­sures of chang­ing sea­sons. But they all keep read­ers and young lis­ten­ers enter­tained, page after page. Wendy Wat­son’s ful­ly imag­ined and fine­ly detailed pic­tures of the splen­did fox fam­i­ly, at home and on joy­ous out­ings, will make chil­dren gig­gle. As The New York Times Book Review explains, “Put it all togeth­er — rhymes and pic­tures — and the book is like a breath of fresh air.”

 

Hap­py Thoughts
writ­ten by Louise Bachelder

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Peter Pau­per Press, 1970
no ISBN yet 

No syn­op­sis yet.

 

How Dear to My Heart
writ­ten by Louise Bachelder

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Peter Pau­per Press, 1970
no ISBN yet

No syn­op­sis yet.

 

Lizzie, the Lost Toys Witch
writ­ten by Mabel Harmer

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Macrae Smith, 1970
ISBN 9780825541254

The Lost Toys Witch goes around and gath­ers up all the toys that are left on carousels, in Kil­li­wid­dy chuck­holes, or in old man Twid­dledink’s toma­to red push­cart.

 

Mag­ic in the Alley
writ­ten by Mary Cal­houn

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Atheneum, 1970
no ISBN yet

Cleery finds a box with sev­en mag­ic items in it and even though the mag­ic is soon spent it brings three friends some­thing of val­ue.

 

Helen Keller
writ­ten by Mar­garet David­son

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Scholas­tic Book Ser­vices, 1970
ISBN 9780590424042

The best­selling biog­ra­phy of Helen Keller and how, with the com­mit­ment and life­long friend­ship of Anne Sul­li­van, she learned to talk, read, and even­tu­al­ly grad­u­ate from col­lege with hon­ors.

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The Jack Book
writ­ten by Irma Simon­ton

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Macmil­lan, Bank Street School of Edu­ca­tion, 1969
no ISBN yet

No syn­op­sis yet.

 

God Bless Us, Every One!
writ­ten by Louise Bachelder

illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
Peter Pau­per Press, 1969
no ISBN yet

Christ­mas-themed anthol­o­gy of say­ings, poet­ry, proverbs and Bible quotes.

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The Hedge­hog and the Hare (the Broth­ers Grimm)
re-told and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son
World, 1969
no ISBN yet

This is the Grimm Broth­er’s ver­sion of one of the best-loved of all folk tales now retold and illus­trat­ed by Wendy Wat­son. The hare taunts the hedge­hog for the short­ness of his legs. The hedge­hog sug­gests a race– and the hare is sur­prised when the hedge­hog wins. The clever hedge­hog had made a plan…