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Winding Oak's Bookology Magazine

Tag Archives | Beatrix Potter

Skinny Dip with Cynthia Grady

Cynthia GradyFor this interview, we visit with Cynthia Grady, author and librarian, at her home in New Mexico.

Which celebrity, living or not, do you wish would invite you to a coffee shop?

Oh, most definitely Beatrix Potter. My earliest literary hero.

Which book do you find yourself recommending passionately?

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman. I turned back to page 1 as soon as I finished reading it.

 Whirley-Pop Hand Crank Popping MachineWhat’s your favorite late-night snack?

Popcorn—fresh popped on the stove in a Whirley-Pop Hand Crank Popping Machine –with lots of butter and salt. But I will pop it and eat it anytime.

Most cherished childhood memory?

I wouldn’t call this my most cherished memory exactly, but one that I’ve been revisiting lately—is how a friend and I roamed several neighborhoods, crossing streets we weren’t allowed to cross, by way of creeks and drainage pipes.  

Tea? Coffee? Milk? Soda? What’s your favorite go-to drink?

Am I allowed to say Irish whiskey? Straight up? After that comes lavender lemonade. Mmmmm. Delicious.

Necco wafersWhat gives you shivers?

The dark. Since age 3.

Your favorite candy as a kid …

Neccos—at the movies.

What’s the strangest tourist attraction you’ve visited?

The Museum of Questionable Medical Devices, now located within the Science Museum of Minnesota. A frightening experience of medical quackery!

RabbitsBrother and sisters or an only child? How did that shape your life?

Ah. I am number six of nine children. Being the youngest of the first six, the eldest of the bottom four, and nearly in the middle overall has shaped every single bit of my life, from my ability to sleep anywhere to my absolute love of silence.  Plus, I display all of the characteristics on those birth order charts.

Best tip for living a contented life?

A house rabbit or two.

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Skinny Dip with Amy Baum

gr_sleepy-hollow-moonWhat keeps you up at night?

The Disney version of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. I had to sleep in my sister’s room for 6 months after that terrifying cartoon.

What’s the first book you remember reading?

Little Bear by Else Holmelund Minarik. I loved Little Bear and his very functional family. Also, I thought it was simply magical that all of the letters spelled out a story. I am still a fan of large type (though that could be my age).

Disclaimer: There was one story that caused many sleepless nights: “Goblin Story” in Little Bear’s Visit. I highly recommend reading this story during a clear, bright day. A big shout out to Kim Faurot at the Saint Paul Public Library Children’s Room.

What’s Your favorite holiday tradition?

Giving Presents for all occasions – I am most certain that there is a holiday packed into every week of the year.

Were you a teacher’s pet or teacher’s challenge?

Oy, such a challenge. I have dyslexia, but that wasn’t a “thing” back in the sixties – hence I was trundled off to speech therapy. It was great fun. We did a lot of puppet shows with Steiff puppets – and while they were very itchy I was a proud porcupine.

Do you like to gift wrap presents?

gr_aaxmanwithlogoYes, shopping, presents and holidays all go hand-in-hand. I have a closet full of cool gift wrap which I buy all year round. I must admit to using gift bags on unwieldy items. Though one can get some swell boxes at The Ax-Man surplus store. It also delights me to watch the painstaking measures some recipients will go to in an effort to preserve the wrapping paper. You people know who you are.

What 3 children’s book authors or illustrators or editors would you like to invite to dinner?

Such an unfair question. I would require the capacity of the Algonquin Round Table and I would try to accommodate SOME list of some of my heroes:

  1. Maurice Sendak
  2. Ursula Nordstrom, aside from being a fabulous editor she wrote one of my favorite books of second grade, The Secret Language.
  3. Edward Gorey
  4. ph_wedgewoodMargaret Wise Brown
  5. A.A. Milne
  6. E.L. Konigsburg
  7. Eric Carle
  8. Nancy Ekholm Burkert
  9. Walter Dean Myers
  10. Beatrix Potter – I eat off her Peter Rabbit Wedgewood every day
  11. E.B. White
  12. Tomi Ungerer
  13. Charlotte Zolotow
  14. Dr. Seuss
  15. M.E. Kerr

I am quite certain that I am leaving several important guests out. By the way – I would not cook out of deference of my guests – catering all the way! I do not use my stove – I occasionally dust it.

What’s your favorite line from a book?

“It is not often that someone comes along who is a true friend and a good writer.”– Charlotte’s Web

What book do you tell everyone to read?

The Phantom Tollbooth, Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present, The Nutshell Library, The Moon Man, A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver. It depends on who my audience is and what their needs are at the time.

Are you a night owl or an early bird?

Both – nighttime is for reading and hanging with my faithful dog. Morning is for “catching up.”

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Interview: Eric Rohmann

Bulldozer’s Big Day
written by Candace Fleming
illustrated by Eric Rohmann
Atheneum, 2015

interview by Vicki Palmquist

What’s the illustration tool you turn to more than any other?

Graphite pencil. Simple, efficient, erasable, feels good in the hand, makes a lovely line with infinite possibilities for line variation. Did I mention that it’s erasable? Always forgiving!

What illustration technique haven’t you tried that keeps calling out to you?

Relief printmaking. The technique gives you so much—the quality of the mark, the layering of color look different than anything I can make with any other technique.

What do you do when you’ve run out of inspiration? What gets you going again?

Making something. Looking at something others have made. It’s a big world out there and there is plenty to see.

ph_EricRohmann-studio

Eric’s studio

Who is your favorite illustrator who is no longer with us? And it could be more than one person.

William Stieg…and  Helen Sewell, Wanda Gag, Maurice Sendak, Crockett Johnson, Robert McCloskey, Virginia Lee Burton, James Marshall…just to name a few.

Did winning the Caldecott (medal and honors) change how you think about your work?

Yes. It made me more attentive, more dedicated, more aware of my audience. It also took off the pressure of ever thinking about such things again!

How and where do you and Candy talk over a new project?

bk_OhNoEverywhere and anywhere. Bulldozer’s Big Day was begun on a car ride from Indianapolis to Chicago. Giant Squid at an ALA hotel room. Oh, No! in Borneo while walking in the jungle.

If you could sit down with four other book artists, living or dead, and have dinner and a conversation, who would they be?

This is not fair! Just four? Hmmm… William Stieg, Beatrix Potter, M.T. Anderson, Maurice Sendak. 

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Turtles in Children’s Literature

Our Bookstormbook, The Shadow Hero, is the origin story of a superhero, The Green Turtle. While this character is not an actual chelonian—though that would be an awesome super hero—there are many turtles and tortoises in children’s literature. Some might even be, technically, terrapins. Here are some notables.

TurtleTimeline_July

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Behind the Books We’ve Loved: A Wilder Rose

Growing up, I loved to read mysteries, biographies, but especially series books. I didn’t read Nancy Drew or Anne of Green Gables (not until I was an adult), but I followed most every other series character. I read Cherry Ames, Sue Barton, Trixie Belden, Beany Malone, Janet Lennon, but especially Louisa May Alcott’s books, the […]

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