Recent Articles

The Shortest Day
Win­ter!
Now that snow has fall­en in many places through­out the land, it’s time to cel­e­brate the frozen crys­tals in pic­ture books, non­fic­tion, and ear­ly chap­ter books.
One Winter Up North
One Win­ter Up North
The Bound­ary Waters Canoe Area Wilder­ness in Min­neso­ta, stretch­ing for 150 miles along the Cana­di­an bor­der, is the set­ting for John Owens’ newest word­less pic­ture book.
Child Life
Mag­a­zine Parade
In which Can­dice F. Ran­som takes a look at Amer­i­can chil­dren’s mag­a­zines from 1789 to today.
Maybe Something Beautiful
Cre­at­ing Kind Communities
We explore com­mu­ni­ty build­ing through High­er Ground, with spe­cial empha­sis on the pow­er of kind­ness. Togeth­er, how can adults and chil­dren cre­ate gen­uine com­mu­ni­ty in our schools and beyond?
Ashanti to Zulu
Abecedaria, Part 2
Not all alpha­bet books are for the pur­pose of ear­ly lit­er­a­cy, nor do they meet the cri­te­ria for tra­di­tion­al alpha­bet books … Still oth­ers are the­mat­i­cal­ly con­nect­ed, as are the fol­low­ing Calde­cott Hon­or ABC books.
If You Come to Earth
If You Come to Earth by Sophie Blackwell
I love read­ing word­less pic­ture books and pic­ture books that are very busy (think Richard Scarry’s books) with small groups of kids. My lat­est favorite of this “genre” is Sophie Blackall’s If You Come to Earth.
I Will Dance
Dance Par­ty
Dance has many per­son­al­i­ties and appeals to a myr­i­ad of peo­ple. Here are some excep­tion­al books for very young read­ers through teens (and adults, too).
Blueberry Crumble
Mushy Bot­tom Blue­ber­ry Crumble
A new recipe is always an adven­ture. I’ve recent­ly exper­i­ment­ed with low car­bo­hy­drate, low sug­ar recipes. Start­ing a new writ­ing project is just as much an exper­i­ment. Each book requires a dif­fer­ent look at research, and I build on what I’ve learned with oth­er projects.
Trout Are Made of Trees
Shar­ing Won­der: April Pul­ley Sayre
We have been think­ing about won­der — about the fas­ci­na­tion we have for the beau­ty, the intri­ca­cy, the mys­tery of the work­ings of the nat­ur­al world.
J.S. Puller
Super­heroes and Lost Things
The titles of J.S. Puller’s first two books intrigued me so much that I imme­di­ate­ly checked them out of the library. Once I fin­ished them, I asked her for an interview.
We Belong
We Belong
I’ve seen many ques­tions on social media, ask­ing which books teach­ers will read aloud to their class­room dur­ing the first week of school. I don’t teach in a class­room but I’ve thought about this ques­tion anyway.
Hero for the Hungry
Hero for the Hungry
So many young read­ers are activists already. How can they help becom­ing Hunger activists after read­ing this book?

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