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Winding Oak's Bookology Magazine

Tag Archives | cooking

Apples, Well-Being, and Family

Bring Me Some Apples and I'll Make You a PieBring Me Some Apples and I’ll Make You a Pie: A Sto­ry about Edna Lewis is a mem­o­rable book about grow­ing food through­out the sea­sons and liv­ing off the land in Vir­ginia. Wild straw­ber­ry, purslane, dan­de­lions, sas­safras, hon­ey. As spring rides the breeze into sum­mer, this extend­ed fam­i­ly tends to their larder, tak­ing full advan­tage of the fruits, nuts, and veg­eta­bles grow­ing around them. Sum­mer sub­dues itself into fall. Time to bring in the corn and beans, take a last har­vest of pecans before win­ter sets in.

This way of life may be unfa­mil­iar to a large per­cent­age of chil­dren, but even though the book is set in the 1920s, every­thing about the sto­ry feels con­tem­po­rary. Per­haps it is a way of life that with­stands time.

Food is the focus because this is a glimpse of the ear­ly life of Edna Lewis, renowned chef and South­ern cook­book author. As the author and water­col­or illus­tra­tor Rob­bin Gour­ley writes, “But her most sig­nif­i­cant con­tri­bu­tion was to make peo­ple aware of the impor­tance of pre­serv­ing tra­di­tion­al meth­ods of grow­ing and prepar­ing food and of bring­ing ingre­di­ents direct­ly from the field to the table.” With our cur­rent resur­gence of inter­est in a farm-to-table lifestyle, this book is a good way to talk about food and nutri­tion with your chil­dren.

Bring Me Some Apples and I'll Bake You a Pie

Quite a few tra­di­tion­al say­ings are includ­ed in the book:

Rac­coon up the pecan tree.
Pos­sum on the ground.
Rac­coon shake the pecans down.
Pos­sum pass ‘em round.”

Your mouth will water so much while you’re read­ing this book that you’ll be glad there are five recipes in the back of the book, from Straw­ber­ry Short­cake to Pecan Drops.

The water­col­or illus­tra­tions through­out are charm­ing and infor­ma­tive, warm and lov­ing. The col­or palette of clear, bright tones adds to the feel­ing of health and well-being.

It’s a worth­while addi­tion to your home, school, or pub­lic library.

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Orange Omelet

Chas­ing Free­dom takes place in the late 1800s—this recipe is one that might have been served at a lun­cheon.

Orange Omelet
Serves 2
A for­got­ten recipe from the 1890s, more of a dessert omelet, resem­bling a sweet crêpe
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Ingre­di­ents
  1. 4 eggs
  2. 5 Tbsp sug­ar
  3. Pinch of salt
  4. 2 organ­ic oranges
  5. 2 T but­ter
Instruc­tions
  1. Grate the rind of one orange on one table­spoon­ful of sug­ar. Pare and cut the orange in thin slices and sprin­kle with two table­spoon­fuls of sug­ar.
  2. Beat the whites of the eggs stiff, add the sug­ar and orange rind, salt, beat­en yolks, and two table­spoon­fuls of orange juice.
  3. Put but­ter in a hot omelet pan and pour in the mix­ture. When it begins to thick­en well, spread over the sliced oranges (no juice).
  4. Fold omelet from the side of the pan over the sliced oranges, turn out on a hot dish.
  5. Put in the oven for two min­utes. Serve imme­di­ate­ly.
Notes
  1. At one time, cook­books were infa­mous for not telling the cook how long or how hot or how to par­tic­u­lar­ly cook the dish. If you’ve cooked an omelet before, this should feel famil­iar.
Adapt­ed from Res­ur­rect­ed Recipes
Bookol­o­gy Mag­a­zine https://www.bookologymagazine.com/
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Dinosaur Eggs

 

Dinosaur Eggs
Serves 6
When you’re done with a day of tromp­ing through the pri­mor­dial savan­nah, on the look­out for dinosaurs, have some of these on hand for your avid dinosaur fans.
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Prep Time
35 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
1 hr
Prep Time
35 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
1 hr
Ingre­di­ents
  1. 6 medi­um hard-boiled eggs
  2. 1.5 lbs ground spicy sausage
  3. 12 cup bread crumbs
  4. 14 tsp gar­lic pow­der
  5. 14 tsp pep­per
  6. 2 Tbsp canola oil
  7. Hot sauce (option­al)
  8. Brown mus­tard (option­al)
Instruc­tions
  1. Peel boiled eggs. Mix sea­son­ings and bread crumbs togeth­er.
  2. Divide sausage into six equal amounts.
  3. Flat­ten sausage into thin pat­ties and wrap around eggs.
  4. Roll each egg in bread crumbs.
  5. Heat oil in skil­let.
  6. Fry eggs in hot oil until well browned, turn­ing fre­quent­ly.
  7. May also be baked in oven at 325 deg F for 25 min­utes or until browned
  8. Serve with hot sauce or mus­tard if desired.
Adapt­ed from allthecooks.com
Adapt­ed from allthecooks.com
Bookol­o­gy Mag­a­zine https://www.bookologymagazine.com/
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Skinny Dip with Kate DiCamillo

Kate DiCamilloDo you remem­ber any book reports you wrote or gave while in ele­men­tary school?

No one has ever asked me this ques­tion before! Here is the truth: I don’t remem­ber doing one, sin­gle book report. Have I blocked the mem­o­ries out? Or did I real­ly not do any? I’m think­ing it’s the lat­ter. Tru­ly.

Describe your all-time favorite pair of paja­mas.

Red flan­nel. Dec­o­rat­ed with dogs. And Milk bones. Divine.

What was the best Hal­loween cos­tume you’ve ever worn or seen?

I love the Bugs Bun­ny mask I wore when I was three. I can still smell the inte­ri­or of that mask. I can still feel the pow­er of *hid­ing* behind that mask.

Are you good at wrap­ping presents?

Ha ha ha. I am laugh­ing. And I can hear my moth­er laugh­ing from the great beyond. I inher­it­ed my inabil­i­ty to wrap presents from her. Present-wrap­ping always ends up with me in the mid­dle of a great big snarl of wrap­ping paper and scotch tape. Imag­ine Bink wrap­ping a present and you get the right visu­al.

Do you like to cook for friends or meet them at a restau­rant?

Still laugh­ing. Cook for friends? Me? I like to go to *their* hous­es and eat *their* food. But I do take them out to restau­rants to return the favor.

Which out­door activ­i­ty are you most like­ly to par­tic­i­pate in: run­ning; fish­ing; leaf rak­ing; parade watch­ing?

Parade watch­ing. I love a parade. And it’s all a parade.

When did you get your first library card, and from what library?

*Swoon* I got my first library card when was I sev­en. I got it from the Coop­er Memo­r­i­al Pub­lic Library.

Favorite bird?

Crow.

 Which children’s book do you wish you’d read as a child?

Matil­da. It wasn’t in our school library or the pub­lic library. Strange, huh?

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Gifted: So, You Want to Be a Chef?

So, You Want to Be a Chef? How to Get Start­ed in the World of Culi­nary Arts Be What You Want series J.M. Bedell Beyond Words/Aladdin, Octo­ber 2013 Intro­duc­tion If your child or teen is often caught watch­ing cook­ing shows, they’re not alone. In 2010, Melis­sa Kossler Dut­ton on ParentDish.com wrote, “Every month, 12 mil­lion […]

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Cooking up a bookstorm

One of my favorite gen­res of read­ing is cook­books. It all began when I was ten, the Christ­mas of 1963. My moth­er gave me Bet­ty Crocker’s Cook Book for Boys and Girls, orig­i­nal­ly pub­lished in 1957 by Gold­en Books, illus­trat­ed by Glo­ria Kamen, and writ­ten by, well, Bet­ty Crock­er, of course! A lot of cook­ing […]

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